Mark C. Ode

Fire/Life Safety Columnist and Code Contributor

Mark C. Ode is a lead engineering associate for Energy & Power Technologies at Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and can be reached at 919.949.2576 and Mark.C.Ode@ul.com.

Articles by Mark C. Ode

November 2017
For years, Article 516 of the National Electrical Code (NEC)— covering spray applications, dipping and coating processes using flammable liquids, combustible liquids and combustible powders—did not seem to change much, if at all. However, there have been substantial changes in the 2014 and 2017 NECs. Definitions were added to 516.2 in the 2014 NEC and then removed or revised in the 2017 NEC. READ MORE
October 2017
Designing and installing specialized electrical equipment with the intent of reducing the incident energy of an arcing fault was first introduced in 240.87 of the 2011 National Electrical Code (NEC) and was further refined in the 2014 NEC. READ MORE
September 2017
Terminology is the vocabulary of technical terms and usages appropriate to a particular trade, science or art. Does it matter what we call something in the National Electrical Code (NEC)? Is there a difference in what something is called in the field or what a component is called in trade slang or an industry term versus the technical term?
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August 2017
Those of us who use the National Electrical Code (NEC) on a regular basis and are familiar with the words as well as the intent of the text can often overlook the most obvious interpretations by the rest of the electrical industry.
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July 2017
In the past two National Electrical Code (NEC) cycles, there have been substantial changes in Article 517 dealing with healthcare facilities. While there were some changes in the 2014 NEC, the majority of changes occurred in the 2017 NEC and are based on changes in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. READ MORE
June 2017
Available short-circuit current requirements were either added or changed in a number of locations in the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC). READ MORE
May 2017
Anyone who has attended a conference in a hotel or other meeting space knows there can be a lack of receptacles to provide power for portable equipment. Sometimes, extension cords or relocatable power taps are plugged into wall receptacles and daisy-chained together to provide power to tables. READ MORE
April 2017
Some regular National Electrical Code (NEC) users may not have noticed major changes in the 2014 and 2017 editions dealing with the emergency and standby power requirements in Article 700, Emergency Systems; Article 701, Legally Required Standby Systems; and Article 702, Optional Standby Systems. READ MORE
March 2017
During the past couple of months, I have had questions about whether a chase nipple, a raceway (conduit) nipple or a hub can be used to enter into panelboards, load centers, switchboards, switchgear, motor control centers and substations as transitions from cable trays into enclosures. READ MORE

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