Mark C. Ode

Fire/Life Safety Columnist and Code Contributor

Mark C. Ode is a lead engineering associate for Energy & Power Technologies at Underwriters Laboratories Inc. and can be reached at 919.949.2576 and Mark.C.Ode@ul.com.

Articles by Mark C. Ode

August 2017
Those of us who use the National Electrical Code (NEC) on a regular basis and are familiar with the words as well as the intent of the text can often overlook the most obvious interpretations by the rest of the electrical industry.
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July 2017
In the past two National Electrical Code (NEC) cycles, there have been substantial changes in Article 517 dealing with healthcare facilities. While there were some changes in the 2014 NEC, the majority of changes occurred in the 2017 NEC and are based on changes in NFPA 99, Health Care Facilities Code. READ MORE
June 2017
Available short-circuit current requirements were either added or changed in a number of locations in the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC). READ MORE
May 2017
Anyone who has attended a conference in a hotel or other meeting space knows there can be a lack of receptacles to provide power for portable equipment. Sometimes, extension cords or relocatable power taps are plugged into wall receptacles and daisy-chained together to provide power to tables. READ MORE
April 2017
Some regular National Electrical Code (NEC) users may not have noticed major changes in the 2014 and 2017 editions dealing with the emergency and standby power requirements in Article 700, Emergency Systems; Article 701, Legally Required Standby Systems; and Article 702, Optional Standby Systems. READ MORE
March 2017
During the past couple of months, I have had questions about whether a chase nipple, a raceway (conduit) nipple or a hub can be used to enter into panelboards, load centers, switchboards, switchgear, motor control centers and substations as transitions from cable trays into enclosures. READ MORE
February 2017
For many years, the mystery of area classification has resided with a select group of experts within the electrical, petrochemical and industrial sectors. Many electricians, electrical engineers, fire inspectors and electrical inspectors have remained outside of this group. READ MORE
January 2017
In the past few months, I have received emails and phone calls from electrical inspectors and contractors stating there is confusion in their areas concerning swimming pool equipotential bonding. They requested that I clarify the bonding requirements for swimming pools. READ MORE
December 2016
The National Electrical Code (NEC) has contained multiwire branch-­circuit color coding since the early 1950s. However, it wasn’t until the 2005 NEC that it required the voltage system to identify ungrounded conductors where a building had more than one voltage system. Each system is identified by separate insulation color coding, marking tape, tagging or other approved means. READ MORE

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