While renewables’ overall contribution to worldwide energy production may still be relatively small compared to traditional sources of power, they have generated no small amount of buzz and hype by always managing to outsize themselves with some newer, bigger and better model that sets the standard for an industry.


Offshore wind power, for example, is making waves in Scotland, despite the fact that it is still a fledgling within the larger industry of wind power. Earlier this summer, English company FoundOcean announced that Graham Construction had awarded it a contract to help install what will be the world’s largest offshore wind turbine in Fife, Scotland.


The S7.0-171, manufactured by Samsung Heavy Industries, is a 7-megawatt turbine that sits atop a 196-meter structure. Its blades measure more than 80 meters and weigh more than 30 tons each.


FoundOcean specializes in grouting offshore construction projects for the energy industry, including oil, gas and renewables. It will complete the Fife project in two phases. The first phase will consist of grouting four piles into sockets that are predrilled almost 100 feet into the rock seabed. The second phase will consist of grouting to form a connection between legs and piles.


A walkway is also being installed to enable visitors to travel the 20 yards offshore to view the turbine up close. FoundOcean is also grouting this portion of the project.


The project is part of the larger Fife Energy Park, which will also include plans for three wind farms that are expected to produce 4 gigawatts of electricity once they are developed.