Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Hand injuries account for roughly one-third of all occupational injuries, one-quarter of all lost time at work and one-fifth of all disability claims.

In this month’s column, I talk with Brett Brenner, president, Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), about the foundation’s mission, the services it offers, the dangers of counterfeit electrical products and more.
 What is the ESFI and its membership about?

Requirements for arc flash labels are addressed in NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, and NFPA 70, National Electrical Code (NEC).

The U.S. DepartmentS of Labor and Health and Human Services estimate that more than half of all employers offer their employees some form of wellness program. Statistics also indicate most organizations that don’t have a program in place plan to add one in the future.

More on Safety

 
Arc rating only

Label Enabled

“What do you mean we need to relabel the electrical equipment? Didn’t we just do this a few years ago?”



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How Engaged Is Your 'Management' With 'Safety on The Job'?

We have heard from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the industry that, for a safety program to be effective, management must be involved. What does that mean? Do they only fund the program? Does management hire just one person to oversee safety?


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Stay Ahead Of The Spark

The leading cause of residential fires in the United States each year—and the second leading cause of nonresidential fires—is electrical failure and malfunction.


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Hot, Humid And Healthy

During the summer, hot weather increases the risk for heat-related injuries and illnesses. Since 2008, more than 100 workers have been killed on the job as a result of heat stress.


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Raise Your Right Hand

Attorney: “Can you tell us how Mr. Smith died?”
 Witness: “There was an electrical explosion. Something went wrong when he was working on the panel. A big fireball shot out that caught his clothing on fire. It was horrible.”



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Beg Your Pardon?

Nearly 30 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous noise every year. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that more than 125,000 workers have suffered significant or permanent hearing loss since 2004.


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Safe Driving Practices 2014

The good newsIntegrated communications networks have evolved faster and more vigorously than the predictions of the boldest forecasters.


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