Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

by
Staff  

Since their inclusion in the National Electrical Code (NEC), arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) have brought greater protection to homes, many of which are increasingly overwhelmed by the growing electrical demands of our high-tech and appliance-rich lifestyles.

The first-ever National Ladder Safety Month, sponsored by the American Ladder Institute (ALI), is taking place this month. According to the ALI, the event is "the only movement dedicated exclusively to the promotion of ladder safety, at home and at work.

Electrical energy is the most common hazardous energy in the workplace. For electricians, linemen and wiremen, it likely is the most familiar. However, hazardous energy comes in many forms, including mechanical, chemical, nuclear, pneumatic, hydraulic and gravitational.

It’s the same old story. An arc flash study was just completed, and the calculated incident energy exceeds 40 calories per square centimeter (cal/cm2) in many locations. When this happens, people often just shake their head and ask, “Now what do we do?”


More on Safety

 
I Feel So Confined

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 



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Will The Owner Know?

As a contractor, you bid on numerous fire alarm system projects based on plans and specifications developed by an engineer. You assume the engineer has discussed such things as quality and reliability with the owner because the specifications focus on those issues.


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Excavating And Trenching

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 50 workers die annually in excavation and trenching accidents. Though most electricians are not directly involved in excavating operations, electrical workers may get involved when completing underground line work.


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Competence And Communication

Recently, I read an article in American School and University magazine by Tom Tapper that discusses competence and communication. Although his article focuses on education, it caused me to consider what the words “competence” and “communication” mean in our fire alarm systems profession. 



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Arc rating only

Label Enabled

“What do you mean we need to relabel the electrical equipment? Didn’t we just do this a few years ago?”



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Web Exclusive
How Engaged Is Your 'Management' With 'Safety on The Job'?

We have heard from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the industry that, for a safety program to be effective, management must be involved. What does that mean? Do they only fund the program? Does management hire just one person to oversee safety?


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Stay Ahead Of The Spark

The leading cause of residential fires in the United States each year—and the second leading cause of nonresidential fires—is electrical failure and malfunction.


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