Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.

Recently, a fire occurred in an 11-story apartment that primarily housed elderly people, although it was not labeled as a senior living building. Six people died and multiple people were injured as a result of the fire.

“You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” That famous song lyric can be appropriately applied to the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E. What is gone? Zero is no longer one of the hazard/risk categories (HRCs).

Conducting preventative maintenance on a car is much more effective and less costly than making repairs after it breaks down. The same goes for occupational safety. Unfortunately, for many years, employers have used lagging indicators as their safety strategy.

More on Safety

 
On The Agenda 2013: OSHA Outlook
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While Congress is preoccupied with sorting out financial issues, President Obama’s re-election is not likely to result in any major immediate changes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) activities. As a result, you can expect more of the same policy priorities this year.

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Watch Where You're Going!
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We’re all aware of distracted driving and the dangers it can create for everyone on the road. What about distracted walking? During spring 2012, a popular online video featured a woman walking through a mall while texting. It’s nothing noteworthy until she falls into the mall’s fountain.

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One Rung at a Time
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Recently, OSHA released some startling statistics: it only takes one second to hit the ground from a height of 16 feet, and more than half of the fatal falls in construction are from heights of less than 25 feet. So a fall can happen in a blink of an eye and can be serious.

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OSHA Renews Partnership With Electrical Contractor Groups to Prevent Workplace Injuries and Fatalities
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As part of continuing efforts to improve safety and health for electrical workers, the U.S.

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Making Sense of the Numbers
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One of the first steps in performing an arc flash hazard calculation study is to request the short-circuit data from the electric utility company.

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A Good Host
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Large corporations and general contractors have evaluated the safety programs and performance of subcontractors—including electrical contractors—for years. Now, the number of companies evaluating contractors seems to be growing.

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Everyone on the Same Label
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Since the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom 2012) passed into law in March, many have discussed the modifications and impact on workers worldwide. One of the areas of major change involves the labeling of hazardous chemicals used at the work site.

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