Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

More on Safety

 
OSHA Announces Final Rule on Silica Dust Protection

Bringing to a close a long, controversial safety stand-off in the construction industry, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) today announced a final rule on respirable silica dust.


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2016 Liberty Mutual Workplace Safety Index Summarizes Top 10 Causes of Disabling Workplace Injuries

Liberty Mutual released its 2016 Workplace Safety Index last month, summarizing the top 10 causes of disabling workplace injuries, using data from Liberty Mutual, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and the National Academy of Social Insurance.


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NIOSH Guidance for Cold Work Conditions

A new report from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), part of the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), outlines recommendations for improving thermal comfort for employees who work in moderately cold environments.


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An Elevated Threat: Ladder Safety

In recent years, ladder-related injuries have been on the rise. It is estimated that more than 90,000 people are hospitalized annually as a result. Additionally, roughly 700 occupational deaths are attributed each year to elevated falls.


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Ready For Your Close-Up

The likelihood of getting inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is pretty low. In fact, each year, state and federal agencies conduct roughly only 100,000 job site inspections.


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Close Quarters

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has had general industry and shipyard standards regulating work in confined spaces for years. Those regulations require employers to determine which safety measures and procedures must be established for work to occur.


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Don't Touch That Dial!

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.


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