Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued a final rule modifying a 40-year-old standard pertaining to exposure to beryllium and beryllium compounds. It contains new requirements for general, construction and shipyard industries.

The first-ever National Ladder Safety Month, sponsored by the American Ladder Institute (ALI), is taking place this month. According to the ALI, the event is "the only movement dedicated exclusively to the promotion of ladder safety, at home and at work.

Electrical energy is the most common hazardous energy in the workplace. For electricians, linemen and wiremen, it likely is the most familiar. However, hazardous energy comes in many forms, including mechanical, chemical, nuclear, pneumatic, hydraulic and gravitational.

It’s the same old story. An arc flash study was just completed, and the calculated incident energy exceeds 40 calories per square centimeter (cal/cm2) in many locations. When this happens, people often just shake their head and ask, “Now what do we do?”


More on Safety

 
Less Than Zero

“You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” That famous song lyric can be appropriately applied to the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E. What is gone? Zero is no longer one of the hazard/risk categories (HRCs).


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Get Out In Front Of Trouble

Conducting preventative maintenance on a car is much more effective and less costly than making repairs after it breaks down. The same goes for occupational safety. Unfortunately, for many years, employers have used lagging indicators as their safety strategy.


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Every Line Of Defense

This article expands on “Control the Risk” (ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, March 2015). It addresses six key areas in the risk-control hierarchy and how each can be used to reduce the risk associated with the arc flash hazard.


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Know Your Arc: DC arc flash calculations

More than a century ago, two giants in the fledgling electrical power industry battled it out for supremacy. The conflict, sometimes referred to as “The War of the Currents,” would define whether electric power systems would use alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC).


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Dickies Workwear Antrim Super Safety Boot has a steel toe cap and a midsole.
Feet On The Ground

Electrocutions are consistently one of the leading causes of workplace fatalities and are a daily hazard for electricians and linemen. As such, various forms of personal protective equipment (PPE) can be worn to prevent direct contact with live wires or energized equipment.


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CGA Promotes Shared Responsibility During National Safe Digging Month

Not everyone knows it, but April is National Safe Digging Month, an event sponsored by the Common Ground Alliance, a 1,700-member organization formed in 2000 to bring together stakeholders involved in the underground utility industry (electric, gas, cable, etc.).


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You Lift Me Up

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 25 people are killed and many others are injured each year in accidents involving aerial lifts. This includes scissor lifts and boom-supported lifts, such as bucket trucks and cherry pickers.


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