Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.

When All Electric Services Inc., 
Carbondale, Ill., won the electrical installation for a water park in its hometown, the company made safety the project’s focus.

Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

Arc flash boundary


This is the fourth article in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc-flash hazard calculations. The first three parts appeared in the January, March and May 2016 issues of Electrical Contractor and can be found at www.ecmag.com.
 Arc flash boundary


More on Safety

 
Excavating And Trenching

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 50 workers die annually in excavation and trenching accidents. Though most electricians are not directly involved in excavating operations, electrical workers may get involved when completing underground line work.


READ MORE
 
Competence And Communication

Recently, I read an article in American School and University magazine by Tom Tapper that discusses competence and communication. Although his article focuses on education, it caused me to consider what the words “competence” and “communication” mean in our fire alarm systems profession. 



READ MORE
 
Arc rating only

Label Enabled

“What do you mean we need to relabel the electrical equipment? Didn’t we just do this a few years ago?”



READ MORE
 
Web Exclusive
How Engaged Is Your 'Management' With 'Safety on The Job'?

We have heard from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the industry that, for a safety program to be effective, management must be involved. What does that mean? Do they only fund the program? Does management hire just one person to oversee safety?


READ MORE
 
Stay Ahead Of The Spark

The leading cause of residential fires in the United States each year—and the second leading cause of nonresidential fires—is electrical failure and malfunction.


READ MORE
 
Hot, Humid And Healthy

During the summer, hot weather increases the risk for heat-related injuries and illnesses. Since 2008, more than 100 workers have been killed on the job as a result of heat stress.


READ MORE
 
Raise Your Right Hand

Attorney: “Can you tell us how Mr. Smith died?”
 Witness: “There was an electrical explosion. Something went wrong when he was working on the panel. A big fireball shot out that caught his clothing on fire. It was horrible.”



READ MORE

Pages