Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Properly” and “Maintained”—these two words always come up when discussing arc flash hazards. Why? Because protective devices such as circuit breakers and relays that have not been properly maintained may not operate as quickly as they should.

There are many frequently asked questions about performing an arc-flash study (risk assessment) and understanding electrical safety requirements. A careful read of standards such as NPFA 70E or IEEE 1584 can answer some questions. Yet, other questions can be more complex.

The first thing that comes to mind when thinking of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is government regulation compliance.

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

More on Safety

OSHA Outlook 2014

The current economic climate in Washington, D.C., is uncertain at best. Last minute approval of the federal budget in late December would seem to offer a little more insight into how the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will operate in 2014.

Such As ...

Two simple words, a total of six letters, help define which electrical equipment is required to have an arc flash label. Although these two words are used with good intentions, they can often leave a person second-guessing themselves.

Breathe Easy

In August, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that included modifications to a 40-year-old-plus standard that addresses respirable crystalline silica exposure limits and other silica-related hazards.

Don't Blow It
by Staff |

On the job, many electricians, linemen, wiremen and other construction-related workers will encounter or use a pneumatic-powered tool at some point. Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air or compressed carbon dioxide (CO2) supplied by a small cylinder.

Arc Flash Studies And GIGO

Mistakes happen, and there are plenty of opportunities to make them when performing an arc flash calculation study. The good news is commercially available arc flash software can help simplify the study process and perhaps even reduce errors.

Follow The Directions

Even the most basic projects can turn deadly when hazards are not assessed and safety rules are not followed (regardless of the worker’s experience).

Heads Up On HazCom Changes

In May 2012, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enacted changes to the Hazard Communication (HazCom) Standard. The goal is to align HazCom with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).