Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 50 workers die annually in excavation and trenching accidents. Though most electricians are not directly involved in excavating operations, electrical workers may get involved when completing underground line work.

Recently, I read an article in American School and University magazine by Tom Tapper that discusses competence and communication. Although his article focuses on education, it caused me to consider what the words “competence” and “communication” mean in our fire alarm systems profession. 


Arc rating only


“What do you mean we need to relabel the electrical equipment? Didn’t we just do this a few years ago?”


The leading cause of residential fires in the United States each year—and the second leading cause of nonresidential fires—is electrical failure and malfunction.

More on Safety

 
On The Agenda 2013: OSHA Outlook
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While Congress is preoccupied with sorting out financial issues, President Obama’s re-election is not likely to result in any major immediate changes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) activities. As a result, you can expect more of the same policy priorities this year.

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Watch Where You're Going!
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We’re all aware of distracted driving and the dangers it can create for everyone on the road. What about distracted walking? During spring 2012, a popular online video featured a woman walking through a mall while texting. It’s nothing noteworthy until she falls into the mall’s fountain.

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A Good Host
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Large corporations and general contractors have evaluated the safety programs and performance of subcontractors—including electrical contractors—for years. Now, the number of companies evaluating contractors seems to be growing.

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One Rung at a Time
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Recently, OSHA released some startling statistics: it only takes one second to hit the ground from a height of 16 feet, and more than half of the fatal falls in construction are from heights of less than 25 feet. So a fall can happen in a blink of an eye and can be serious.

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OSHA Renews Partnership With Electrical Contractor Groups to Prevent Workplace Injuries and Fatalities
by Staff |
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As part of continuing efforts to improve safety and health for electrical workers, the U.S.

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Making Sense of the Numbers
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One of the first steps in performing an arc flash hazard calculation study is to request the short-circuit data from the electric utility company.

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Everyone on the Same Label
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Since the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom 2012) passed into law in March, many have discussed the modifications and impact on workers worldwide. One of the areas of major change involves the labeling of hazardous chemicals used at the work site.

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