Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), distracted driving causes more than 3,000 deaths and nearly 400,000 injuries each year. Automobile accidents also account for more work-related fatalities than any other cause.

A significant number of pages in the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E are devoted to 17 informative annexes. Although technically not part of the mandatory text, these pages can be an important source of additional information and guidance. 


Every year, dozens of people are killed and many more are injured in accidents involving aerial lifts, including cranes, digger derricks, scissor lifts, and boom-­supported lifts, such as bucket trucks and cherry pickers.

Prescription opioid abuse has been a major health problem in the United States for the last 25 years and is now in the news almost daily.

More on Safety

 
Electrical Safety Training: What Could Go Wrong?

Performing electrical work without being properly trained can be deadly. I have seen this hold true during numerous investigations.



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Fire Fighters: The arc of safety bends toward AFCIs

Once a bedroom-only requirement, arc-fault 
circuit interrupters (AFCIs)­—either as breakers or receptacles—today are required in almost all areas of the home.


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People In The Equation: Understanding the implications 
of installation and design


Addressable fire alarm systems are the typical choice for new installations. The programmability gives designers and installers an astounding array of operational features. However, occupants may not understand their responsibilities or how to interpret an alarm. 



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Incident-Energy Calculations

This article is the third in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. Parts 1 and 2 appeared in the January and March 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, respectively.


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Saving The Day

Wiremen and linemen face more than twice the mortality rate of police officers or firefighters. Due to being in a confined position, many deaths and injuries occur while workers are on top of utility poles and in elevated bucket trucks.


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The Brain Game: On-the-Job Head Protection


Head injuries account for thousands of on-the-job injuries and many preventable fatalities each year. Struck-by hazards are also one of the leading types of occupational injuries in the construction industry.


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OSHA Announces Final Rule on Silica Dust Protection

Bringing to a close a long, controversial safety stand-off in the construction industry, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) today announced a final rule on respirable silica dust.


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