Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Every day, More than 2,000 people incur job-related eye injuries that require medical treatment. It is estimated that proper eye and face protection can prevent 90 percent of these injuries.

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.

More on Safety

Solid Conductors, Nonlinear Loads, Hazardous Locations and More

Article 100 Definitions Article 110 Requirements for Electrical Installations Article 210 Branch Circuits Article 220 Branch-Circuit, Feeder and Service Calculations Article 300 Wiring Methods Article 310 Conductors for General Wiring Article 450 Transformers and Transformer Vaults Article 500 Hazar

Production, Comfort and Ergonomics

‘The right tool for the job’ is more than just a cliche The war rages on about ergonomics. The available science, costs and responsibility for musculoskeletal injuries seems to be the focus.

A Roller Coaster of Code Requirements

Regulations for public places and amusement parks Attempting to design a fire alarm system for an amusement park can be as daunting to some as riding a roller coaster.

Precursors to a Fall

Slips, trips and stumbles can lead to serious injury Falls may not sound like a serious topic, but they cost billions each year. They account for 15 percent of workplace injuries and one-third of construction fatalities.

Eye and Face Protection

Safety should be the best motivator It’s hard to resist telling morbid stories of occupational accidents to motivate individuals to take safety precautions. However, the ease with which foreign objects can enter the eyes should speak for itself.

The Dirt On Ground Rods

If you’re reading this, chances are you have enjoyed the sense of accomplishment that comes from driving an 8-foot long, mostly steel rod into the earth and connecting a ground wire to it. It’s tough work.

Surviving an OSHA Inspection

When a Compliance Safety and Health Officer (CSHO) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) visits an unprepared job site, the reactions can be amusing. Usually, the word travels throughout the site and employees scramble.