Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

With the constant emphasis on workplace safety from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, it’s easy to forget the hazards that exist in our everyday lives. In fact, people are six times more likely to suffer an injury away from work.

UPDATE: OSHA has delayed the deadline by an additional two weeks until Dec. 15. Click here for the official announcement from OSHA.

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

More on Safety

 
Are You Safer at Work?

Accidents are one of the leading causes of death in the United States, but the majority of accidents do not occur at work.


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Disaster After the Disaster?

Soon it will be one year since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, causing devastating flooding. While recovery continues at a frustratingly slow pace, a new hurricane season approaches.


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Safety Consciousness

When you have employees, there are definite benefits to focusing on safety in your company’s culture. If safety measures are defined and followed, employees feel more secure and are more productive.


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OSHA Paperwork Compliance

In previous years, the horror stories of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) paperwork violations were overwhelming. For example, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) citations to contractors for simple items such as rebar and dishwashing liquid went missing.


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Who's Responsible for Fall Protection?

The North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Administration (NCOSHA) Division of Safety Research investigated the fatal fall of an electrical mechanic. The mechanic had fallen through an unguarded floor opening.


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Working Hot

Time and again, electricians are told to deenergize for compliance and safety. Of course, there are exceptions. The question is what justifies an exception. Answering this requires a review of the regulation. To apply it to real life, one needs something more thought-provoking.


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What to Wear?

On certain jobs, electricians can find themselves in an environment where the noise level exceeds the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) time-weighted average limit of 90 decibels. A noise level of 90 decibels is approximately that of a lawn mower or subway train.


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