Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

With the constant emphasis on workplace safety from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, it’s easy to forget the hazards that exist in our everyday lives. In fact, people are six times more likely to suffer an injury away from work.

UPDATE: OSHA has delayed the deadline by an additional two weeks until Dec. 15. Click here for the official announcement from OSHA.

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

More on Safety

 
The New Year Begins Now

The new year may not be here just yet, but the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) is! And with it comes new requirements to help protect workers from arc-flash hazards.



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OSHA Brings General Industries' Standards on Slip, Trip and Fall Hazards Up to Speed with Construction Standards

On November 17, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule updating Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment (Fall Protection Systems) standards in general industries such as building management services, utilities, warehousing, retail, windo


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Easy On The Eyes: Eye Protection

Every day, More than 2,000 people incur job-related eye injuries that require medical treatment. It is estimated that proper eye and face protection can prevent 90 percent of these injuries.


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Beyond Labels And PPE

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on www.ecmag.com.



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OSHA Updates Guidelines for Health and Safety Programs

In October, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released an updated set of Recommended Practices for Safety and Health programs, bringing the original guidelines from 1989 into the 21st century.


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Emphasizing Compliance

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.


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The Sky Isn't Falling: Avoiding Accidents Involving Falling Objects

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.


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