Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The dog days of summer are upon us. It is vacation season, and employees are likely to spend more time outdoors on home-improvement projects and other leisure activities. With so much emphasis on job safety, it’s easy to forget that most injuries and illnesses actually happen away from work.

I’ve heard it all before. “What were they thinking when they wrote this standard? If I were them, this is how I would have done it.” When it comes to arc flash and electrical safety standards, complaints, armchair quarterbacking and second-guessing follow as soon as the latest edition comes out.

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.

More than a century ago, two giants in the fledgling electrical power industry battled it out for supremacy. The conflict, sometimes referred to as “The War of the Currents,” would define whether electric power systems would use alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC).

More on Safety

 
System upgrades, short-circuit current

Why Does It Change?
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It goes up. It goes down. Sometimes, it is thought to be infinite (although it isn’t), and other times, it seems impossible to find. The available short-circuit current from the electric utility is one of the more important pieces of information for an arc flash hazard calculation study.

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Require No Fire
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Fires and explosions in the workplace result in nearly 200 fatalities and injure some 5,000 workers every year. The resulting costs of such incidents reach more than $2 billion annually.

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Slips, Trips And Falls
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Slips, trips and falls are the second leading cause of death in the workplace and account for more than 1 million hospital visits in the United States each year. During the winter months, hazardous weather conditions greatly increase the risk for such incidents.

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OSHA Outlook 2014
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The current economic climate in Washington, D.C., is uncertain at best. Last minute approval of the federal budget in late December would seem to offer a little more insight into how the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will operate in 2014.

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Such As ...
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Two simple words, a total of six letters, help define which electrical equipment is required to have an arc flash label. Although these two words are used with good intentions, they can often leave a person second-guessing themselves.


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Breathe Easy
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In August, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that included modifications to a 40-year-old-plus standard that addresses respirable crystalline silica exposure limits and other silica-related hazards.

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Don't Blow It
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On the job, many electricians, linemen, wiremen and other construction-related workers will encounter or use a pneumatic-powered tool at some point. Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air or compressed carbon dioxide (CO2) supplied by a small cylinder.

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