Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

This article expands on “Control the Risk” (ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, March 2015). It addresses six key areas in the risk-control hierarchy and how each can be used to reduce the risk associated with the arc flash hazard.

More than a century ago, two giants in the fledgling electrical power industry battled it out for supremacy. The conflict, sometimes referred to as “The War of the Currents,” would define whether electric power systems would use alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC).

At many workplaces, driving is a part of everyday life. Unfortunately, more than 1,700 people are killed in occupation-related transportation accidents every year—roughly 40 percent of all on-the-job fatalities. However, safety precautions can be taken to help reduce the number of incidents.


One of the more popular American show-business legends is the one about P.T. Barnum and the egress. In 1841, Barnum launched his American Museum at the corner of Broadway and Ann Street in Lower Manhattan.

Electrical Contractor Magazine

More on Safety

 
An Accident: Investigation in Action
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Thousands of accidents occur in the electrical construction industry each year. Accidents are defined as “an unplanned event that results in personal injury or property damage.” Their severity ranges from minor injury and minimal property damage to million-dollar losses and fatalities.

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Fire in the Workplace
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On March 25, 1911, 146 workers were killed in a fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist factory. The impact of this industrial disaster resulted in fire-prevention legislation, factory inspections and better working conditions for all workers. Eighty years later, on Sept.

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Deciding Who Pays
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Safety violations on a construction site or multi-employer work site often present a dilemma regarding responsibility. Who pays? When it comes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the answer is everyone.

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Half Full or Half Empty?
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What’s new in the lightning protection field? From a technical standpoint, not much, although the lightning rod disguised as a rooster on a barn has been replaced by more efficient transmitters.

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To Belt or Not to Belt?
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Body belts and body harnesses are often the first things that come to mind when fall protection is mentioned. But confusion arises over where and when they should be used.

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Lightning Can Strike Twice
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Though lightning season may be over by now, it is worth reviewing the impact storms can have on the operation of a facility. Some may have experienced significant damage to equipment from the high frequency transient energy of lightning strikes.

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Hazards of the Fall
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The latest Bureau of Labor Statistics data reveals that, in 2001, 27 people involved in electrical construction were killed by falls while performing their jobs. This places falls as the second leading cause of fatalities in our industry.

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