Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

The dog days of summer are upon us. It is vacation season, and employees are likely to spend more time outdoors on home-improvement projects and other leisure activities. With so much emphasis on job safety, it’s easy to forget that most injuries and illnesses actually happen away from work.

I’ve heard it all before. “What were they thinking when they wrote this standard? If I were them, this is how I would have done it.” When it comes to arc flash and electrical safety standards, complaints, armchair quarterbacking and second-guessing follow as soon as the latest edition comes out.

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.

More on Safety

 
The Dirt On Ground Rods
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If you’re reading this, chances are you have enjoyed the sense of accomplishment that comes from driving an 8-foot long, mostly steel rod into the earth and connecting a ground wire to it. It’s tough work.

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Surviving an OSHA Inspection
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When a Compliance Safety and Health Officer (CSHO) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) visits an unprepared job site, the reactions can be amusing. Usually, the word travels throughout the site and employees scramble.

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Basic Chemistry
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Avoid the hazards of chemicals whenever possible Electrical contractors can find themselves in a variety of environments. But whether you are rewiring a chemical industrial plant or simply working on a residential site using a lubricant to help pull wire, you can be exposed to hazardous chemicals.

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Cable Removal's Myriad Questions
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As much as 8.5 million miles of abandoned cable will, sooner or later, be removed. Who pays? How will it be done? What will go up in its place? Such questions emanate from new requirements in the 2002 National Electrical Code. Answers will come in time.

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Safety First, Last and Everything in Between
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You have been hearing it for years—invest in safety and the money will come. There is a direct positive correlation. If you purposely risk the safety of employees to save a couple of bucks, you will probably lose much more in the long run. Why risk it?

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Practicing Safety Defines Your Image
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Frequent readers of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR are more than likely aware of the existence of federal OSHA regulations and other contractual standards for safe work practices in construction.

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A Hidden Shock
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The problems with multiwire circuits On March 20, 1883, a U.S. Patent was issued to Thomas A.

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