Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

It might surprise most people to learn that 97 percent of all unintentional injury-related deaths—and 87 percent of all medically consulted unintentional injuries—actually occur off the job.


Performing electrical work without being properly trained can be deadly. I have seen this hold true during numerous investigations.


Once a bedroom-only requirement, arc-fault 
circuit interrupters (AFCIs)­—either as breakers or receptacles—today are required in almost all areas of the home.

Addressable fire alarm systems are the typical choice for new installations. The programmability gives designers and installers an astounding array of operational features. However, occupants may not understand their responsibilities or how to interpret an alarm. 


More on Safety

 
Exits, Emergency Lighting, Safety Switches and More

Article 250-Grounding and Bonding Article 312-Cabinets, Cutout Boxes, and Meter Socket Enclosures Article 314- Outlet, Device, Pull, and Junction Boxes; Conduit Bodies; Fittings; and Handhold Enclosures Article 350-Liquidtight Flexible Metal Conduit: Type LFMC Article 404-Switches Article 410-Lumina


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Getting Grounded

Mike and Jennifer Striegel had hardly started their Memorial Day trip last year when lightning ripped through their Oklahoma home.


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Cables Are Not Created Equal

Fire case histories make an argument for requiring survivability of all fire alarm system circuits. A fire occurred in the London Apartments for the elderly in Delaware, Ohio, on March 12, 1994. Manual fire alarm boxes and corridor smoke detectors were connected to the building’s fire alarm system.


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Climbing the Ladder

Each year, thousands of workers are injured while working on ladders. Falls from ladders result in cuts, bruises, broken bones, and in some cases, lost lives. The three most common causes are ladders in poor condition, improper selection and improper use.


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How's My Driving?

Approximately one in every 100,000 workers dies annually in vehicle accidents. Eleven percent of these occur in construction. A number of studies have been done to determine the causes. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) published a report highlighting these causes.


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An OSHA Compliance Comparison

The safety record of contractors often comes under scrutiny. General contractors and host employers review the programs, workers' comp records and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) citations of the subcontractors they hire.


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Fire Foresight: Tragedy Equals Lessons Learned

It took just minutes for the 2003 nightmare at The Station nightclub in West Warwick, R.I., to reach its climax. The blaze was Rhode Island's most devastating fire in decades and the fourth-deadliest nightclub fire in U.S. history.


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