Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

More on Safety

 
Test Your Knowledge

Understanding personal protective equipment:


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Understanding Electrical Hazards

Historically, shock and electrocution have been seen as the primary electrical hazards to people, along with fires of electrical origin, but today, awareness is growing of two other electrical hazards: arc-flash and arc-blast.


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Pain in the Back
by Staff |

Employers must help protect against workplace back injuries


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Your Donation May Save Your Life
by Staff |

By July 17, 2006, the multiyear initiative by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) had received an initial $1.25 million in contributions from the industry.


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Scaffold Safety
by Staff |

Targeting accident prevention: Scaffolds are a common source of accidents in electrical construction; in South Carolina, a 34-year-old electrician fell 12 feet to his death from a mobile scaffold.


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Apply the Brakes

Ensure your safety with a pre-trip inspection   Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury for all ages. Crashes occurring on the job have profound financial effects on employees, their families, coworkers and employers.


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