Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

As a contractor, you bid on numerous fire alarm system projects based on plans and specifications developed by an engineer. You assume the engineer has discussed such things as quality and reliability with the owner because the specifications focus on those issues.

Orientations, safety talks, task training, job briefings and safety meetings each require an interaction between the company and the employee.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 


According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 50 workers die annually in excavation and trenching accidents. Though most electricians are not directly involved in excavating operations, electrical workers may get involved when completing underground line work.

More on Safety

 
Deciding Who Pays
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Safety violations on a construction site or multi-employer work site often present a dilemma regarding responsibility. Who pays? When it comes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the answer is everyone.

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Half Full or Half Empty?
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What’s new in the lightning protection field? From a technical standpoint, not much, although the lightning rod disguised as a rooster on a barn has been replaced by more efficient transmitters.

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To Belt or Not to Belt?
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Body belts and body harnesses are often the first things that come to mind when fall protection is mentioned. But confusion arises over where and when they should be used.

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Lightning Can Strike Twice
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Though lightning season may be over by now, it is worth reviewing the impact storms can have on the operation of a facility. Some may have experienced significant damage to equipment from the high frequency transient energy of lightning strikes.

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Hazards of the Fall
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The latest Bureau of Labor Statistics data reveals that, in 2001, 27 people involved in electrical construction were killed by falls while performing their jobs. This places falls as the second leading cause of fatalities in our industry.

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Hazard Communication
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OSHA’s Hazard Communication Standard came out in the 1980s with a bang. Initially, few businesses were able to avoid a citation for noncompliance to its chemical safety provisions.

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A Fatal Lesson
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Electrocution is the No. 1 cause of fatalities in the electrical construction industry. On the surface, this may seem natural. The focus of the work involves electricity. But consider this: electricians are supposed to be highly skilled at handling dangerous electrical energy.

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