Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.

When All Electric Services Inc., 
Carbondale, Ill., won the electrical installation for a water park in its hometown, the company made safety the project’s focus.

Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

Arc flash boundary


This is the fourth article in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc-flash hazard calculations. The first three parts appeared in the January, March and May 2016 issues of Electrical Contractor and can be found at www.ecmag.com.
 Arc flash boundary


More on Safety

 
Tools & Safety

Like most professions, electrical construction requires attention to proper selection and care of tools. Tool safety for electrical work has many facets. The wrong tool or a tool in disrepair can lead to injury. In addition, certain tools used by electricians serve as a form of protective gear.


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Hazardous Chemicals

The Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom) continues to be one of the top 15 OSHA standards violated by electrical contractors. It was first developed to protect against the possibility of chemical-source injury or illness.


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OSHA Steps up 70E Training

Ken Mastrullo is having a busy year. Between February and June 2005, the NFPA 70E senior electrical specialist traveled to 15 different sites in the United States and Canada to educate groups about the standard that is defining electrical safety.


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A Contractors Dream

Nonmetallic-sheathed (NM) cable with less pulling resistance? Self-healing aluminum cables? Cable that burns with limited smoke? Cable is not just cable anymore. If you are like me, you grumble when things go awry.


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Fatal Electrocutions

The following series of fatalities was studied by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Each involves contact with energized lines or equipment. In every case, NIOSH came to the same conclusion. After reading them, you can compare your thoughts to that conclusion.


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Tool Abuse and Misuse

The tools electricians use every day pose the risk of injury-ranging from banging a thumb with a hammer to serious accidents with power tools. And when projects require working near live conductors or circuit parts, using the wrong tool or making a simple mistake can have fatal results.


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OSHA Update: What to expect from OSHA in 2005

Periodically, it is a good idea to take a look at the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) activities and their plans for the future. This is particularly true following a presidential election.


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