Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

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“What do you mean we need to relabel the electrical equipment? Didn’t we just do this a few years ago?”


We have heard from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the industry that, for a safety program to be effective, management must be involved. What does that mean? Do they only fund the program? Does management hire just one person to oversee safety?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 50 workers die annually in excavation and trenching accidents. Though most electricians are not directly involved in excavating operations, electrical workers may get involved when completing underground line work.

Recently, I read an article in American School and University magazine by Tom Tapper that discusses competence and communication. Although his article focuses on education, it caused me to consider what the words “competence” and “communication” mean in our fire alarm systems profession. 


More on Safety

 
Controlling Hazardous Energy
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To be safe, take it step by step Controlling hazardous energy or lockout/tagout (LOTO) can be a complex subject for the electrical industry. Different regulations address it from all perspectives.

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Watch Your Back
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Back disorders cost electrical contractors millions of dollars each year. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reports that more than 1 million workers suffer back disorders annually. They account for 20 percent of workplace injuries and illnesses.

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An Accident: Investigation in Action
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Thousands of accidents occur in the electrical construction industry each year. Accidents are defined as “an unplanned event that results in personal injury or property damage.” Their severity ranges from minor injury and minimal property damage to million-dollar losses and fatalities.

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Fire in the Workplace
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On March 25, 1911, 146 workers were killed in a fire at the Triangle Shirtwaist factory. The impact of this industrial disaster resulted in fire-prevention legislation, factory inspections and better working conditions for all workers. Eighty years later, on Sept.

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Deciding Who Pays
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Safety violations on a construction site or multi-employer work site often present a dilemma regarding responsibility. Who pays? When it comes to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the answer is everyone.

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Half Full or Half Empty?
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What’s new in the lightning protection field? From a technical standpoint, not much, although the lightning rod disguised as a rooster on a barn has been replaced by more efficient transmitters.

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To Belt or Not to Belt?
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Body belts and body harnesses are often the first things that come to mind when fall protection is mentioned. But confusion arises over where and when they should be used.

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