Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

More on Safety

 
Sorry, What Did You Say?

No one would disagree that a job site is a noisy place, so noisy that it can lead to hearing loss over time. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has named hearing loss one of 21 priority areas for research in the future. Hearing loss is 100 percent preventable.


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A Very Short Guide to NFPA 70E

Editor's note: The following is the last article Brooke Stauffer submitted to ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR; we've been holding it for some time because of the uncertainty of his status.


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Step Right Up

Ladders, like wire cutters and electrical tape, are important to the electrical contractor; however, their use tends to carry with it many hazards. When used properly, the hazards can be controlled.


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What's Your Sign?

When a hazard exists at a work site, there are two ways to limit access. First is a positive form where the hazardous area is under lock-and-key access, and the operator has control over who enters. Second is the passive form, which is where signs come into play.


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Stigma Against Nuclear Energy Changing, According to Recent Student Conference
by Staff |

From March 29-31, The American Nuclear Society held its student conference at Oregon State University (OSU), in Corvallis, Ore., which is noted for its nuclear engineering program.


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Preventing Electrical Incidents

Several hazards hold the most potential for injuries No matter how comfortable an electrician feels working with electricity, danger must never be overlooked. OSHA estimates about 350 electrical-related deaths occur each year.


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The Enforcers

OSHA protects workplaces through focused efforts


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