Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

An arc-flash study should not be thought of simply as an item that needs to be checked off the list. However, many people still view it this way.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 5 million U.S. workers are required to wear respirators. For linemen and wiremen, respirators protect against environments with insufficient oxygen levels, harmful airborne dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases, vapors and sprays.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 


As a contractor, you bid on numerous fire alarm system projects based on plans and specifications developed by an engineer. You assume the engineer has discussed such things as quality and reliability with the owner because the specifications focus on those issues.

More on Safety

 
A Roller Coaster of Code Requirements
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Regulations for public places and amusement parks Attempting to design a fire alarm system for an amusement park can be as daunting to some as riding a roller coaster.

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Precursors to a Fall
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Slips, trips and stumbles can lead to serious injury Falls may not sound like a serious topic, but they cost billions each year. They account for 15 percent of workplace injuries and one-third of construction fatalities.

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Eye and Face Protection
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Safety should be the best motivator It’s hard to resist telling morbid stories of occupational accidents to motivate individuals to take safety precautions. However, the ease with which foreign objects can enter the eyes should speak for itself.

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The Dirt On Ground Rods
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If you’re reading this, chances are you have enjoyed the sense of accomplishment that comes from driving an 8-foot long, mostly steel rod into the earth and connecting a ground wire to it. It’s tough work.

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Surviving an OSHA Inspection
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When a Compliance Safety and Health Officer (CSHO) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) visits an unprepared job site, the reactions can be amusing. Usually, the word travels throughout the site and employees scramble.

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Basic Chemistry
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Avoid the hazards of chemicals whenever possible Electrical contractors can find themselves in a variety of environments. But whether you are rewiring a chemical industrial plant or simply working on a residential site using a lubricant to help pull wire, you can be exposed to hazardous chemicals.

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Cable Removal's Myriad Questions
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As much as 8.5 million miles of abandoned cable will, sooner or later, be removed. Who pays? How will it be done? What will go up in its place? Such questions emanate from new requirements in the 2002 National Electrical Code. Answers will come in time.

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