Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In recent years, the number of counterfeit consumer safety products and electronic components has grown exponentially in the United States. The problem has become so widespread that counterfeit airplane parts were even found in Air Force One.

The new year may not be here just yet, but the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) is! And with it comes new requirements to help protect workers from arc-flash hazards.


On November 17, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule updating Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment (Fall Protection Systems) standards in general industries such as building management services, utilities, warehousing, retail, windo

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on www.ecmag.com.


More on Safety

 
OSHA Paperwork Compliance

In previous years, the horror stories of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) paperwork violations were overwhelming. For example, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) citations to contractors for simple items such as rebar and dishwashing liquid went missing.


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Who's Responsible for Fall Protection?

The North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Administration (NCOSHA) Division of Safety Research investigated the fatal fall of an electrical mechanic. The mechanic had fallen through an unguarded floor opening.


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Working Hot

Time and again, electricians are told to deenergize for compliance and safety. Of course, there are exceptions. The question is what justifies an exception. Answering this requires a review of the regulation. To apply it to real life, one needs something more thought-provoking.


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What to Wear?

On certain jobs, electricians can find themselves in an environment where the noise level exceeds the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) time-weighted average limit of 90 decibels. A noise level of 90 decibels is approximately that of a lawn mower or subway train.


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Safety Outlook 2006

While taking time to look at the construction year ahead, don’t forget safety. While preparing your 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (posting deadline Feb. 1), reflect on changes needed to prevent future accidents.


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Buyer Beware

Months after the devastation caused by hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the flooding that followed, cleanup efforts in New Orleans and Gulf Coast areas slowly continue. In many areas, rebuilding has yet to begin. The electrical industry is heavily involved in recovery efforts.


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Quality, Safety & Code Compliance

The National Electrical Installation Standards (NEIS) are the first quality and performance standards for electrical construction.


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