Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.

When All Electric Services Inc., 
Carbondale, Ill., won the electrical installation for a water park in its hometown, the company made safety the project’s focus.

Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

More on Safety

 
Quality, Safety & Code Compliance

The National Electrical Installation Standards (NEIS) are the first quality and performance standards for electrical construction.


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Shock Therapy

If you have been following this column, you generally read about actions to prevent injuries. At times, an accident review is used to provide insight into safety procedures that can avoid reoccurrences. This article began as a lesson in what to do to avoid an electrical shock.


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Arc-Flash Protection

Approximately 50 electrical workers die and thousands more are injured each year from electrical accidents. Many of these are due to burns from electric arcs.


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Plan of Action

In the chaos of finishing a large electrical project on time, it can be difficult to focus on commissioning the fire alarm system.


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Facing the Genesis: MasterFormat 2004

A leading architecture/engineering member of the CSI revision team (who requested anonymity) described the genesis of the change to MasterFormat 2004 this way: “Division 16 was used to describe means and methods of lighting and distribution of power in buildings.


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70E Reaches the Customer

As the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E standard takes root in electrical practices, getting the right training to the right people has become the greatest hurdle in changing the way electricians do their job.


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High-Tech Cures for Hospital Lighting

Drive past hospitals at night and you are sure to see lights glowing in many windows. But as hospital mangers seek advanced lighting technology to reduce energy consumption, that glow is changing. Healthcare facilities want more from their lighting these days.


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