Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

This article is the third in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. Parts 1 and 2 appeared in the January and March 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, respectively.

While National Electrical Safety Month was created and is also primarily managed by the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), a number of other entities engage in activities and promote in other ways.

On March 25, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published its final rule, updating the more than 40-year-old standard addressing respirable crystalline silica exposure limits and other silica-related hazards.

Collisions between workers and vehicles are some of the most expensive incidents on a work site. Beyond the most important form of defense—having diligent and well-trained workers on-site—some contractors use digital solutions to prevent collisions.

More on Safety

 
Quality, Safety & Code Compliance

The National Electrical Installation Standards (NEIS) are the first quality and performance standards for electrical construction.


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Shock Therapy

If you have been following this column, you generally read about actions to prevent injuries. At times, an accident review is used to provide insight into safety procedures that can avoid reoccurrences. This article began as a lesson in what to do to avoid an electrical shock.


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Arc-Flash Protection

Approximately 50 electrical workers die and thousands more are injured each year from electrical accidents. Many of these are due to burns from electric arcs.


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Plan of Action

In the chaos of finishing a large electrical project on time, it can be difficult to focus on commissioning the fire alarm system.


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Facing the Genesis: MasterFormat 2004

A leading architecture/engineering member of the CSI revision team (who requested anonymity) described the genesis of the change to MasterFormat 2004 this way: “Division 16 was used to describe means and methods of lighting and distribution of power in buildings.


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70E Reaches the Customer

As the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E standard takes root in electrical practices, getting the right training to the right people has become the greatest hurdle in changing the way electricians do their job.


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Life Safety Signaling Update

Sending a fire alarm signal is not enough. State-of-the-art fire alarm and life safety technology now allows for a host of data, instructions, graphics and other functions that get people out of danger quickly.


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