Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

Arc flash boundary


This is the fourth article in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc-flash hazard calculations. The first three parts appeared in the January, March and May 2016 issues of Electrical Contractor and can be found at www.ecmag.com.
 Arc flash boundary


If you don’t agree that a fire alarm system is more than a fire alarm system, you should probably revisit Chapter 21, Emergency Control Function Interfaces, in NFPA 72 2016, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

Slips, trips and falls are leading causes of death in the workplace. In addition, they account for more than 1 million hospital visits nationwide each year, resulting in thousands of disabling injuries. Many of these incidents can be prevented by adhering to some basic safety protocols.

More on Safety

 
Working Hot

Time and again, electricians are told to deenergize for compliance and safety. Of course, there are exceptions. The question is what justifies an exception. Answering this requires a review of the regulation. To apply it to real life, one needs something more thought-provoking.


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What to Wear?

On certain jobs, electricians can find themselves in an environment where the noise level exceeds the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) time-weighted average limit of 90 decibels. A noise level of 90 decibels is approximately that of a lawn mower or subway train.


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Safety Outlook 2006

While taking time to look at the construction year ahead, don’t forget safety. While preparing your 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (posting deadline Feb. 1), reflect on changes needed to prevent future accidents.


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Buyer Beware

Months after the devastation caused by hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the flooding that followed, cleanup efforts in New Orleans and Gulf Coast areas slowly continue. In many areas, rebuilding has yet to begin. The electrical industry is heavily involved in recovery efforts.


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Quality, Safety & Code Compliance

The National Electrical Installation Standards (NEIS) are the first quality and performance standards for electrical construction.


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Shock Therapy

If you have been following this column, you generally read about actions to prevent injuries. At times, an accident review is used to provide insight into safety procedures that can avoid reoccurrences. This article began as a lesson in what to do to avoid an electrical shock.


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Arc-Flash Protection

Approximately 50 electrical workers die and thousands more are injured each year from electrical accidents. Many of these are due to burns from electric arcs.


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