Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

More on Safety

 
The Eyes Have It

Imagine working in construction with limited or no vision. Try walking across the site with your eyes closed—not easy. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates 2,000 eye injuries occur every day at work.


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What's Happening at OSHA

Inspections and citations are down. Little activity has occurred on the advancement of new regulations. In addition, if we look at the proposed budget for 2008, funding seems inappropriate to keep pace with rising costs.


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Man, Is It Cold!

Unless you live in a warm climate year-round, it’s time to start reviewing the proper way to deal with the cold. There are four factors that contribute to cold stress: air temperature, wind, dampness of the air and contact with water and surfaces.


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A Fungus Among Us

Electrical contractors find themselves in a wide range of locations, and many locations can present environmental hazards. Mold is one hazard that has received a great deal of attention. The following may help workers better understand the dangers mold can pose.


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This or That?

What do you do when the air quality at work is found to be a hazard? The best way to protect your employees is to get rid of the hazard. Ventilation is an engineering control that may eliminate respiratory hazards. You can try to control exposure administratively through scheduling.


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Construction Safety Should Be Paramount

If OSHA adheres to its self-imposed schedule, next month we should see a final rule clarifying when an employer is required to pay for personal protective equipment for employees. Bear in mind, however, that OSHA’s ruling is not necessarily the final word on a subject.


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Safety Training: What's New in 2007

According to the 2007 learning and development survey conducted by the Chartered Institute of Professional Development (CIPD), little has been changed in the methods selected by company trainers.


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