Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Every day, More than 2,000 people incur job-related eye injuries that require medical treatment. It is estimated that proper eye and face protection can prevent 90 percent of these injuries.

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.

More on Safety

Apply the Brakes

Ensure your safety with a pre-trip inspection   Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury for all ages. Crashes occurring on the job have profound financial effects on employees, their families, coworkers and employers.

Changes Long Overdue

Subpart V revisions and line construction The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 444 serious injuries and 74 fatalities occur annually among employees involved in electric power generation, transmission and distribution work.

Passing the Test

Choosing and using test equipment correctly is critical There are no proven tricks or shortcutsthat will estimate the voltage in a circuit. Qualified workers must use a tester to determine if the wires or equipment are energized.

Critical Elements

There are a limited number and amount of chemicals that electricians use to perform their work. Wire lubricants, contact cleaners, etc., are used in sparing quantities. However, the number and variety of substances they can be exposed to is unlimited.

Heat, Sunshine and Safety

It is common knowledge that too much sun and heat are dangerous. What electrical contractors may find surprising is the impact of these hazards and the control the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) may exercise over an employer for providing protection.

OSHA Update 2006

As usual, there is much to report on changes involving the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). New legislation has been proposed, advances have been made on proposed regulations, and new cooperative programs and materials have been created.

Are You Safer at Work?

Accidents are one of the leading causes of death in the United States, but the majority of accidents do not occur at work.