Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In recent years, the number of counterfeit consumer safety products and electronic components has grown exponentially in the United States. The problem has become so widespread that counterfeit airplane parts were even found in Air Force One.

The new year may not be here just yet, but the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) is! And with it comes new requirements to help protect workers from arc-flash hazards.


On November 17, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule updating Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment (Fall Protection Systems) standards in general industries such as building management services, utilities, warehousing, retail, windo

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on www.ecmag.com.


More on Safety

 
Understanding Electrical Hazards

Historically, shock and electrocution have been seen as the primary electrical hazards to people, along with fires of electrical origin, but today, awareness is growing of two other electrical hazards: arc-flash and arc-blast.


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Pain in the Back
by Staff |

Employers must help protect against workplace back injuries


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Your Donation May Save Your Life
by Staff |

By July 17, 2006, the multiyear initiative by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) had received an initial $1.25 million in contributions from the industry.


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Scaffold Safety
by Staff |

Targeting accident prevention: Scaffolds are a common source of accidents in electrical construction; in South Carolina, a 34-year-old electrician fell 12 feet to his death from a mobile scaffold.


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Apply the Brakes

Ensure your safety with a pre-trip inspection   Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury for all ages. Crashes occurring on the job have profound financial effects on employees, their families, coworkers and employers.


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Changes Long Overdue

Subpart V revisions and line construction The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 444 serious injuries and 74 fatalities occur annually among employees involved in electric power generation, transmission and distribution work.


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Passing the Test

Choosing and using test equipment correctly is critical There are no proven tricks or shortcutsthat will estimate the voltage in a circuit. Qualified workers must use a tester to determine if the wires or equipment are energized.


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