Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

The dog days of summer are upon us. It is vacation season, and employees are likely to spend more time outdoors on home-improvement projects and other leisure activities. With so much emphasis on job safety, it’s easy to forget that most injuries and illnesses actually happen away from work.

I’ve heard it all before. “What were they thinking when they wrote this standard? If I were them, this is how I would have done it.” When it comes to arc flash and electrical safety standards, complaints, armchair quarterbacking and second-guessing follow as soon as the latest edition comes out.

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.

More on Safety

 
OSHA Steps up 70E Training
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Ken Mastrullo is having a busy year. Between February and June 2005, the NFPA 70E senior electrical specialist traveled to 15 different sites in the United States and Canada to educate groups about the standard that is defining electrical safety.

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A Contractors Dream
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Nonmetallic-sheathed (NM) cable with less pulling resistance? Self-healing aluminum cables? Cable that burns with limited smoke? Cable is not just cable anymore. If you are like me, you grumble when things go awry.

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Fatal Electrocutions
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The following series of fatalities was studied by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Each involves contact with energized lines or equipment. In every case, NIOSH came to the same conclusion. After reading them, you can compare your thoughts to that conclusion.

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Tool Abuse and Misuse
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The tools electricians use every day pose the risk of injury-ranging from banging a thumb with a hammer to serious accidents with power tools. And when projects require working near live conductors or circuit parts, using the wrong tool or making a simple mistake can have fatal results.

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Concrete-Encased Electrodes, Soldering Connections and More
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Derating of conductors Q: One of my residential wiring jobs was turned down because I did not derate four two-wire-with-ground NM-B cables where they pass through a single hole in an upper wood plate.

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Safety Training: A Review of Compliance and Effectiveness
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The emphasis the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) places on education and training for accident prevention is demonstrated by the number of standards on the topic and the number of citations issued for lack of training.

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Safety in the Workplace-Fire Resistant Clothing
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Hazards exist in every workplace in many different forms: sharp edges, falling objects, flying sparks, chemicals, noise and myriad other potentially dangerous situations.

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