Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.

As the dangers of arc flash have become better known, the market for arc-rated (AR) clothing has grown. Unlike earlier offerings, many of today’s garments can be comfortable to wear on a daily basis.

With winter rapidly approaching, it is important to protect workers from the coming cold temperatures and potential extreme weather. Prolonged exposure to these conditions can result in serious health problems, including trench foot, hypothermia and frostbite.

In all likelihood, you will never be involved in a scenario involving an intruder or active shooter in the workplace. But in the event you find yourself in this situation, this article provides basic background and awareness information on how to respond.

More on Safety

Arc-Flash Protection

Approximately 50 electrical workers die and thousands more are injured each year from electrical accidents. Many of these are due to burns from electric arcs.

Plan of Action

In the chaos of finishing a large electrical project on time, it can be difficult to focus on commissioning the fire alarm system.

Facing the Genesis: MasterFormat 2004

A leading architecture/engineering member of the CSI revision team (who requested anonymity) described the genesis of the change to MasterFormat 2004 this way: “Division 16 was used to describe means and methods of lighting and distribution of power in buildings.

Life Safety Signaling Update

Sending a fire alarm signal is not enough. State-of-the-art fire alarm and life safety technology now allows for a host of data, instructions, graphics and other functions that get people out of danger quickly.

A Long Way Down

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 2.3 million construction workers (65 percent of the total construction work force) frequently work on scaffolds. Electrical contractors are no exception. A large portion of their work is performed on scaffolds and aerial lifts.

High-Tech Cures for Hospital Lighting

Drive past hospitals at night and you are sure to see lights glowing in many windows. But as hospital mangers seek advanced lighting technology to reduce energy consumption, that glow is changing. Healthcare facilities want more from their lighting these days.

Emergency Preparedness and Response

The threat of terrorist attacks has brought attention to company emergency action plans including construction employer programs.