Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), distracted driving causes more than 3,000 deaths and nearly 400,000 injuries each year. Automobile accidents also account for more work-related fatalities than any other cause.

A significant number of pages in the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E are devoted to 17 informative annexes. Although technically not part of the mandatory text, these pages can be an important source of additional information and guidance. 


Every year, dozens of people are killed and many more are injured in accidents involving aerial lifts, including cranes, digger derricks, scissor lifts, and boom-­supported lifts, such as bucket trucks and cherry pickers.

Prescription opioid abuse has been a major health problem in the United States for the last 25 years and is now in the news almost daily.

More on Safety

 
Industry Organizations Respond

The industry heard the warnings and saw the red flags. On Sept. 7, 2004, the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) entered into a national agreement with its International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) labor partner to provide a national substance-abuse policy.


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The Rules of the Road

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently published some startling statistics. Every 12 minutes, someone dies in a motor vehicle crash. An injury occurs every 10 seconds, and every five seconds, a crash occurs.


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Self-Taught Safety

In theory, lockout/tagout (LOTO) is a simple concept. Basically, you disconnect equipment or circuits from their energy source and put a lock or tag in place, so no one can connect the equipment while you work. This should control any hazardous energy to which employees will be exposed.


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Ladder Safety School

On the morning of October 9, 1996, a 34-year-old male electrician apprentice was fatally injured in a fall from an extension ladder. The California Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (CA/FACE) was contacted to conduct an investigation.


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When a Little is Too Much

Drug and alcohol problems exist at work with great frequency.


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OSHA Offers Tips to Protect Yourself from Cold Weather
by Staff |

Some areas of the nation have already experienced the harsh, sometimes damaging effects of winter.


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The Eyes Have It

Imagine working in construction with limited or no vision. Try walking across the site with your eyes closed—not easy. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates 2,000 eye injuries occur every day at work.


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