Electrical Contractor Magazine

Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In recent years, thousands of occupational fatalities and injuries have occurred as a result of electrical contact. Many of these accidents happen when workers do not use the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for the job or they use it improperly.

System upgrades, short-circuit current


It goes up. It goes down. Sometimes, it is thought to be infinite (although it isn’t), and other times, it seems impossible to find. The available short-circuit current from the electric utility is one of the more important pieces of information for an arc flash hazard calculation study.

Fires and explosions in the workplace result in nearly 200 fatalities and injure some 5,000 workers every year. The resulting costs of such incidents reach more than $2 billion annually.

The current economic climate in Washington, D.C., is uncertain at best. Last minute approval of the federal budget in late December would seem to offer a little more insight into how the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will operate in 2014.

Electrical Contractor Magazine

More on Safety

 
A Roller Coaster of Code Requirements
| under

Regulations for public places and amusement parks Attempting to design a fire alarm system for an amusement park can be as daunting to some as riding a roller coaster.

READ MORE
 
Precursors to a Fall
| under

Slips, trips and stumbles can lead to serious injury Falls may not sound like a serious topic, but they cost billions each year. They account for 15 percent of workplace injuries and one-third of construction fatalities.

READ MORE
 
Eye and Face Protection
| under

Safety should be the best motivator It’s hard to resist telling morbid stories of occupational accidents to motivate individuals to take safety precautions. However, the ease with which foreign objects can enter the eyes should speak for itself.

READ MORE
 
The Dirt On Ground Rods
| under

If you’re reading this, chances are you have enjoyed the sense of accomplishment that comes from driving an 8-foot long, mostly steel rod into the earth and connecting a ground wire to it. It’s tough work.

READ MORE
 
Surviving an OSHA Inspection
| under

When a Compliance Safety and Health Officer (CSHO) from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) visits an unprepared job site, the reactions can be amusing. Usually, the word travels throughout the site and employees scramble.

READ MORE
 
Basic Chemistry
| under

Avoid the hazards of chemicals whenever possible Electrical contractors can find themselves in a variety of environments. But whether you are rewiring a chemical industrial plant or simply working on a residential site using a lubricant to help pull wire, you can be exposed to hazardous chemicals.

READ MORE
 
Cable Removal's Myriad Questions
| under

As much as 8.5 million miles of abandoned cable will, sooner or later, be removed. Who pays? How will it be done? What will go up in its place? Such questions emanate from new requirements in the 2002 National Electrical Code. Answers will come in time.

READ MORE

Pages