Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.

As the dangers of arc flash have become better known, the market for arc-rated (AR) clothing has grown. Unlike earlier offerings, many of today’s garments can be comfortable to wear on a daily basis.

With winter rapidly approaching, it is important to protect workers from the coming cold temperatures and potential extreme weather. Prolonged exposure to these conditions can result in serious health problems, including trench foot, hypothermia and frostbite.

In all likelihood, you will never be involved in a scenario involving an intruder or active shooter in the workplace. But in the event you find yourself in this situation, this article provides basic background and awareness information on how to respond.

More on Safety

Working Hot

Time and again, electricians are told to deenergize for compliance and safety. Of course, there are exceptions. The question is what justifies an exception. Answering this requires a review of the regulation. To apply it to real life, one needs something more thought-provoking.

What to Wear?

On certain jobs, electricians can find themselves in an environment where the noise level exceeds the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) time-weighted average limit of 90 decibels. A noise level of 90 decibels is approximately that of a lawn mower or subway train.

Safety Outlook 2006

While taking time to look at the construction year ahead, don’t forget safety. While preparing your 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (posting deadline Feb. 1), reflect on changes needed to prevent future accidents.

Buyer Beware

Months after the devastation caused by hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the flooding that followed, cleanup efforts in New Orleans and Gulf Coast areas slowly continue. In many areas, rebuilding has yet to begin. The electrical industry is heavily involved in recovery efforts.

Quality, Safety & Code Compliance

The National Electrical Installation Standards (NEIS) are the first quality and performance standards for electrical construction.

Shock Therapy

If you have been following this column, you generally read about actions to prevent injuries. At times, an accident review is used to provide insight into safety procedures that can avoid reoccurrences. This article began as a lesson in what to do to avoid an electrical shock.

Facing the Genesis: MasterFormat 2004

A leading architecture/engineering member of the CSI revision team (who requested anonymity) described the genesis of the change to MasterFormat 2004 this way: “Division 16 was used to describe means and methods of lighting and distribution of power in buildings.