Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Construction workers often use energy drinks, such as Monster and Red Bull, for a quick pick-me-up. However, many people are unaware of the risks their consumption poses. Using these highly caffeinated and nutritionally deficient beverages can result in serious health complications.

The U.S. Department of Labor and the Mine Safety and Health Administration have begun investigating situations where employees were sent to work alone.

As the weather starts to heat up across the United States, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has launched a campaign to help workers prevent heat-related illnesses when working outdoors.

June 12–18, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) held off its inaugural Safe + Sound Week, a nationwide event similar to the successful National Safety Stand Down week each May.

More on Safety

 
Heads Up

While the thick, hard bones of the skull and the surrounding membranes help protect the brain, a head injury may include an injury to the brain.


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Industry Organizations Respond

The industry heard the warnings and saw the red flags. On Sept. 7, 2004, the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) entered into a national agreement with its International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) labor partner to provide a national substance-abuse policy.


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The Rules of the Road

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently published some startling statistics. Every 12 minutes, someone dies in a motor vehicle crash. An injury occurs every 10 seconds, and every five seconds, a crash occurs.


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Self-Taught Safety

In theory, lockout/tagout (LOTO) is a simple concept. Basically, you disconnect equipment or circuits from their energy source and put a lock or tag in place, so no one can connect the equipment while you work. This should control any hazardous energy to which employees will be exposed.


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Ladder Safety School

On the morning of October 9, 1996, a 34-year-old male electrician apprentice was fatally injured in a fall from an extension ladder. The California Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (CA/FACE) was contacted to conduct an investigation.


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When a Little is Too Much

Drug and alcohol problems exist at work with great frequency.


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OSHA Offers Tips to Protect Yourself from Cold Weather
by Staff |

Some areas of the nation have already experienced the harsh, sometimes damaging effects of winter.


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