Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Each year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) lists its top 10 violations for the year. One list is for construction-site safety violations, and the other is for nonconstruction workplace safety violations.


The U.S. DepartmentS of Labor and Health and Human Services estimate that more than half of all employers offer their employees some form of wellness program. Statistics also indicate most organizations that don’t have a program in place plan to add one in the future.

In recent years, the number of counterfeit consumer safety products and electronic components has grown exponentially in the United States. The problem has become so widespread that counterfeit airplane parts were even found in Air Force One.

The new year may not be here just yet, but the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) is! And with it comes new requirements to help protect workers from arc-flash hazards.


More on Safety

 
Sorry, What Did You Say?

No one would disagree that a job site is a noisy place, so noisy that it can lead to hearing loss over time. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has named hearing loss one of 21 priority areas for research in the future. Hearing loss is 100 percent preventable.


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A Very Short Guide to NFPA 70E

Editor's note: The following is the last article Brooke Stauffer submitted to ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR; we've been holding it for some time because of the uncertainty of his status.


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Step Right Up

Ladders, like wire cutters and electrical tape, are important to the electrical contractor; however, their use tends to carry with it many hazards. When used properly, the hazards can be controlled.


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What's Your Sign?

When a hazard exists at a work site, there are two ways to limit access. First is a positive form where the hazardous area is under lock-and-key access, and the operator has control over who enters. Second is the passive form, which is where signs come into play.


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Stigma Against Nuclear Energy Changing, According to Recent Student Conference
by Staff |

From March 29-31, The American Nuclear Society held its student conference at Oregon State University (OSU), in Corvallis, Ore., which is noted for its nuclear engineering program.


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Preventing Electrical Incidents

Several hazards hold the most potential for injuries No matter how comfortable an electrician feels working with electricity, danger must never be overlooked. OSHA estimates about 350 electrical-related deaths occur each year.


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The Enforcers

OSHA protects workplaces through focused efforts


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