Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The first thing that comes to mind when thinking of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is government regulation compliance.

“Properly” and “Maintained”—these two words always come up when discussing arc flash hazards. Why? Because protective devices such as circuit breakers and relays that have not been properly maintained may not operate as quickly as they should.

There are many frequently asked questions about performing an arc-flash study (risk assessment) and understanding electrical safety requirements. A careful read of standards such as NPFA 70E or IEEE 1584 can answer some questions. Yet, other questions can be more complex.

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

More on Safety

Safety Links, Files and Applications: Exploring the OSHA Web Site

Since 1970, when the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) was established, it seems as though there has been no end to the addition or changing of regulations. Fortunately, time has provided advances in technology to cope with the growing number of requirements.

OSHA Paperwork Compliance

In previous years, the horror stories of Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) paperwork violations were overwhelming. For example, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) citations to contractors for simple items such as rebar and dishwashing liquid went missing.

Who's Responsible for Fall Protection?

The North Carolina Occupational Safety and Health Administration (NCOSHA) Division of Safety Research investigated the fatal fall of an electrical mechanic. The mechanic had fallen through an unguarded floor opening.

Working Hot

Time and again, electricians are told to deenergize for compliance and safety. Of course, there are exceptions. The question is what justifies an exception. Answering this requires a review of the regulation. To apply it to real life, one needs something more thought-provoking.

What to Wear?

On certain jobs, electricians can find themselves in an environment where the noise level exceeds the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s (OSHA) time-weighted average limit of 90 decibels. A noise level of 90 decibels is approximately that of a lawn mower or subway train.

Safety Outlook 2006

While taking time to look at the construction year ahead, don’t forget safety. While preparing your 2006 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Form 300A, Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (posting deadline Feb. 1), reflect on changes needed to prevent future accidents.

Buyer Beware

Months after the devastation caused by hurricanes Katrina and Rita and the flooding that followed, cleanup efforts in New Orleans and Gulf Coast areas slowly continue. In many areas, rebuilding has yet to begin. The electrical industry is heavily involved in recovery efforts.