Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Hand injuries account for roughly one-third of all occupational injuries, one-quarter of all lost time at work and one-fifth of all disability claims.

In this month’s column, I talk with Brett Brenner, president, Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), about the foundation’s mission, the services it offers, the dangers of counterfeit electrical products and more.
 What is the ESFI and its membership about?

Requirements for arc flash labels are addressed in NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace, and NFPA 70, National Electrical Code (NEC).

The U.S. DepartmentS of Labor and Health and Human Services estimate that more than half of all employers offer their employees some form of wellness program. Statistics also indicate most organizations that don’t have a program in place plan to add one in the future.

More on Safety

 
Safety Training: What's New in 2007

According to the 2007 learning and development survey conducted by the Chartered Institute of Professional Development (CIPD), little has been changed in the methods selected by company trainers.


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This or That?

What do you do when the air quality at work is found to be a hazard? The best way to protect your employees is to get rid of the hazard. Ventilation is an engineering control that may eliminate respiratory hazards. You can try to control exposure administratively through scheduling.


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Construction Safety Should Be Paramount

If OSHA adheres to its self-imposed schedule, next month we should see a final rule clarifying when an employer is required to pay for personal protective equipment for employees. Bear in mind, however, that OSHA’s ruling is not necessarily the final word on a subject.


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Sorry, What Did You Say?

No one would disagree that a job site is a noisy place, so noisy that it can lead to hearing loss over time. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has named hearing loss one of 21 priority areas for research in the future. Hearing loss is 100 percent preventable.


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A Very Short Guide to NFPA 70E

Editor's note: The following is the last article Brooke Stauffer submitted to ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR; we've been holding it for some time because of the uncertainty of his status.


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Step Right Up

Ladders, like wire cutters and electrical tape, are important to the electrical contractor; however, their use tends to carry with it many hazards. When used properly, the hazards can be controlled.


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What's Your Sign?

When a hazard exists at a work site, there are two ways to limit access. First is a positive form where the hazardous area is under lock-and-key access, and the operator has control over who enters. Second is the passive form, which is where signs come into play.


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