Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 5 million U.S. workers are required to wear respirators. For linemen and wiremen, respirators protect against environments with insufficient oxygen levels, harmful airborne dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases, vapors and sprays.

An arc-flash study should not be thought of simply as an item that needs to be checked off the list. However, many people still view it this way.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 


As a contractor, you bid on numerous fire alarm system projects based on plans and specifications developed by an engineer. You assume the engineer has discussed such things as quality and reliability with the owner because the specifications focus on those issues.

More on Safety

 
Integration: Easy Does It
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All or nothing doesn't necessarily cut it in integrated systems. Now, end-users can integrate all or some of their building management and security functions-letting the level of integration fit the facility.

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Tools & Safety
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Like most professions, electrical construction requires attention to proper selection and care of tools. Tool safety for electrical work has many facets. The wrong tool or a tool in disrepair can lead to injury. In addition, certain tools used by electricians serve as a form of protective gear.

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Hazardous Chemicals
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The Hazard Communication Standard (HazCom) continues to be one of the top 15 OSHA standards violated by electrical contractors. It was first developed to protect against the possibility of chemical-source injury or illness.

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Tool Abuse and Misuse
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The tools electricians use every day pose the risk of injury-ranging from banging a thumb with a hammer to serious accidents with power tools. And when projects require working near live conductors or circuit parts, using the wrong tool or making a simple mistake can have fatal results.

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OSHA Steps up 70E Training
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Ken Mastrullo is having a busy year. Between February and June 2005, the NFPA 70E senior electrical specialist traveled to 15 different sites in the United States and Canada to educate groups about the standard that is defining electrical safety.

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A Contractors Dream
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Nonmetallic-sheathed (NM) cable with less pulling resistance? Self-healing aluminum cables? Cable that burns with limited smoke? Cable is not just cable anymore. If you are like me, you grumble when things go awry.

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Fatal Electrocutions
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The following series of fatalities was studied by the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Each involves contact with energized lines or equipment. In every case, NIOSH came to the same conclusion. After reading them, you can compare your thoughts to that conclusion.

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