Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

More on Safety

 
Cycles of Safety

Millions of people spend a significant portion of their lives working in high-rise office buildings.


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Portable Hazards

Portable generators supply electricity where none is available. They commonly are used following natural disasters and at construction sites. Portable generators produce electricity with an internal combustion engine that is run on a fuel source, usually gasoline, diesel, kerosene or propane.


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ESFI Announces 2008 Outstanding Service Award Recipient
by Staff |

The Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI) selected Jack Wells, vice president of corporate development for Pass & Seymour/Legrand, as the inaugural recipient of the foundation’s Outstanding Service Award.


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Risk of Home Fires Rises as Life Expectancy, Energy Consumption Increase
by Staff |

Home electrical fires cause more than 500 deaths, 1,400 injuries, and $1.4 billion in property damage each year. According to a report recently released by the U.S.


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Remember the Basics

Tools, both hand and power, are found at every job site regardless of the trade. While tools are a craftsman’s friends, they bring hazards. The same tool that makes a job easier also can be the cause of an accident.


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Fire Proof

Throughout US history, there have been near-legendary workplace fires. In 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City caused 150 deaths. As recently as 1991, a fire at the Imperial Foods poultry processing plant in North Carolina caused 25 worker deaths and 49 injuries.


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A Partnership That Works Still Has Much Work to Do

The chance of an average worker sustaining a fatal injury on the job is slim. There were just 3.7 fatal occupational injuries per 100,000 workers in the United States in 2007, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.


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