Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.

When All Electric Services Inc., 
Carbondale, Ill., won the electrical installation for a water park in its hometown, the company made safety the project’s focus.

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.

Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

More on Safety

 
Get Involved From The Inside

I’ve heard it all before. “What were they thinking when they wrote this standard? If I were them, this is how I would have done it.” When it comes to arc flash and electrical safety standards, complaints, armchair quarterbacking and second-guessing follow as soon as the latest edition comes out.


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Train Before Trucking

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.


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Buckle Up

At many workplaces, driving is a part of everyday life. Unfortunately, more than 1,700 people are killed in occupation-related transportation accidents every year—roughly 40 percent of all on-the-job fatalities. However, safety precautions can be taken to help reduce the number of incidents.



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In Case Of Fire: Which Way to Egress?

One of the more popular American show-business legends is the one about P.T. Barnum and the egress. In 1841, Barnum launched his American Museum at the corner of Broadway and Ann Street in Lower Manhattan.


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Alarms Can Cry Wolf

Recently, a fire occurred in an 11-story apartment that primarily housed elderly people, although it was not labeled as a senior living building. Six people died and multiple people were injured as a result of the fire.


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Less Than Zero

“You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” That famous song lyric can be appropriately applied to the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E. What is gone? Zero is no longer one of the hazard/risk categories (HRCs).


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Get Out In Front Of Trouble

Conducting preventative maintenance on a car is much more effective and less costly than making repairs after it breaks down. The same goes for occupational safety. Unfortunately, for many years, employers have used lagging indicators as their safety strategy.


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