Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The term “safe” is defined as a state that is secure from the liability to harm, injury, danger or risk. The basic condition of being safe involves actions taken to remain protected or guarded from danger and to reduce risks to the lowest possible level.

The JATC of Greater Boston’s training room is stocked with essential PPE.

The Electrical trade is one of the most dangerous to work in. Electricians face the usual hazards found on most job sites, and the additional risk of electrical shock can cause serious injuries and death.


Asbestos is a well-known hazard because of attorney solicitations for clients exposed to it, public media messages and the material’s widespread use.

According to Wes Wheeler, director of safety for the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA), a number of issues are currently up in the air under the Trump administration, specifically some federal safety regulations that can affect electrical contractors.

More on Safety

 
Important Modifications: Proposed changes to silica regulations

On March 25, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published its final rule, updating the more than 40-year-old standard addressing respirable crystalline silica exposure limits and other silica-related hazards.


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Watching Out For You: Collision Prevention

Collisions between workers and vehicles are some of the most expensive incidents on a work site. Beyond the most important form of defense—having diligent and well-trained workers on-site—some contractors use digital solutions to prevent collisions.


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Who's At Fault? Avoiding workplace accidents

It might surprise most people to learn that 97 percent of all unintentional injury-related deaths—and 87 percent of all medically consulted unintentional injuries—actually occur off the job.



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Electrical Safety Training: What Could Go Wrong?

Performing electrical work without being properly trained can be deadly. I have seen this hold true during numerous investigations.



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Fire Fighters: The arc of safety bends toward AFCIs

Once a bedroom-only requirement, arc-fault 
circuit interrupters (AFCIs)­—either as breakers or receptacles—today are required in almost all areas of the home.


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People In The Equation: Understanding the implications 
of installation and design


Addressable fire alarm systems are the typical choice for new installations. The programmability gives designers and installers an astounding array of operational features. However, occupants may not understand their responsibilities or how to interpret an alarm. 



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Incident-Energy Calculations

This article is the third in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. Parts 1 and 2 appeared in the January and March 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, respectively.


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