Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The first thing that comes to mind when thinking of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is government regulation compliance.

“Properly” and “Maintained”—these two words always come up when discussing arc flash hazards. Why? Because protective devices such as circuit breakers and relays that have not been properly maintained may not operate as quickly as they should.

There are many frequently asked questions about performing an arc-flash study (risk assessment) and understanding electrical safety requirements. A careful read of standards such as NPFA 70E or IEEE 1584 can answer some questions. Yet, other questions can be more complex.

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

More on Safety

Passing the Test

Choosing and using test equipment correctly is critical There are no proven tricks or shortcutsthat will estimate the voltage in a circuit. Qualified workers must use a tester to determine if the wires or equipment are energized.

Critical Elements

There are a limited number and amount of chemicals that electricians use to perform their work. Wire lubricants, contact cleaners, etc., are used in sparing quantities. However, the number and variety of substances they can be exposed to is unlimited.

Heat, Sunshine and Safety

It is common knowledge that too much sun and heat are dangerous. What electrical contractors may find surprising is the impact of these hazards and the control the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) may exercise over an employer for providing protection.

OSHA Update 2006

As usual, there is much to report on changes involving the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). New legislation has been proposed, advances have been made on proposed regulations, and new cooperative programs and materials have been created.

Are You Safer at Work?

Accidents are one of the leading causes of death in the United States, but the majority of accidents do not occur at work.

Disaster After the Disaster?

Soon it will be one year since Hurricanes Katrina and Rita struck New Orleans and the Mississippi Gulf Coast, causing devastating flooding. While recovery continues at a frustratingly slow pace, a new hurricane season approaches.

Safety Consciousness

When you have employees, there are definite benefits to focusing on safety in your company’s culture. If safety measures are defined and followed, employees feel more secure and are more productive.