Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.

As the dangers of arc flash have become better known, the market for arc-rated (AR) clothing has grown. Unlike earlier offerings, many of today’s garments can be comfortable to wear on a daily basis.

With winter rapidly approaching, it is important to protect workers from the coming cold temperatures and potential extreme weather. Prolonged exposure to these conditions can result in serious health problems, including trench foot, hypothermia and frostbite.

In all likelihood, you will never be involved in a scenario involving an intruder or active shooter in the workplace. But in the event you find yourself in this situation, this article provides basic background and awareness information on how to respond.

More on Safety

Your Donation May Save Your Life
by Staff |

By July 17, 2006, the multiyear initiative by the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) had received an initial $1.25 million in contributions from the industry.

Scaffold Safety
by Staff |

Targeting accident prevention: Scaffolds are a common source of accidents in electrical construction; in South Carolina, a 34-year-old electrician fell 12 feet to his death from a mobile scaffold.

Apply the Brakes

Ensure your safety with a pre-trip inspection   Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury for all ages. Crashes occurring on the job have profound financial effects on employees, their families, coworkers and employers.

Changes Long Overdue

Subpart V revisions and line construction The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 444 serious injuries and 74 fatalities occur annually among employees involved in electric power generation, transmission and distribution work.

Passing the Test

Choosing and using test equipment correctly is critical There are no proven tricks or shortcutsthat will estimate the voltage in a circuit. Qualified workers must use a tester to determine if the wires or equipment are energized.

Critical Elements

There are a limited number and amount of chemicals that electricians use to perform their work. Wire lubricants, contact cleaners, etc., are used in sparing quantities. However, the number and variety of substances they can be exposed to is unlimited.

Heat, Sunshine and Safety

It is common knowledge that too much sun and heat are dangerous. What electrical contractors may find surprising is the impact of these hazards and the control the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) may exercise over an employer for providing protection.