Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 5 million U.S. workers are required to wear respirators. For linemen and wiremen, respirators protect against environments with insufficient oxygen levels, harmful airborne dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases, vapors and sprays.

An arc-flash study should not be thought of simply as an item that needs to be checked off the list. However, many people still view it this way.

Orientations, safety talks, task training, job briefings and safety meetings each require an interaction between the company and the employee.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 


More on Safety

 
Quality, Safety & Code Compliance
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The National Electrical Installation Standards (NEIS) are the first quality and performance standards for electrical construction.

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Shock Therapy
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If you have been following this column, you generally read about actions to prevent injuries. At times, an accident review is used to provide insight into safety procedures that can avoid reoccurrences. This article began as a lesson in what to do to avoid an electrical shock.

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Arc-Flash Protection
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Approximately 50 electrical workers die and thousands more are injured each year from electrical accidents. Many of these are due to burns from electric arcs.

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Plan of Action
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In the chaos of finishing a large electrical project on time, it can be difficult to focus on commissioning the fire alarm system.

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Facing the Genesis: MasterFormat 2004
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A leading architecture/engineering member of the CSI revision team (who requested anonymity) described the genesis of the change to MasterFormat 2004 this way: “Division 16 was used to describe means and methods of lighting and distribution of power in buildings.

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70E Reaches the Customer
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As the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 70E standard takes root in electrical practices, getting the right training to the right people has become the greatest hurdle in changing the way electricians do their job.

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Life Safety Signaling Update
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Sending a fire alarm signal is not enough. State-of-the-art fire alarm and life safety technology now allows for a host of data, instructions, graphics and other functions that get people out of danger quickly.

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