Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Every day, More than 2,000 people incur job-related eye injuries that require medical treatment. It is estimated that proper eye and face protection can prevent 90 percent of these injuries.

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on

In October, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released an updated set of Recommended Practices for Safety and Health programs, bringing the original guidelines from 1989 into the 21st century.

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.

More on Safety

Strike Force

Here's a statistic: Lightning strikes the United States more than 25 million times each year. Sadly, these strikes are responsible for nearly 500 deaths and more than 2,000 injuries.

The Power of Safety

After OSHA performs an inspection, it may issue citations for any violations. Citations must be in writing and describe the nature of the violation. Congress created OSHA on Dec.

Heads Up

While the thick, hard bones of the skull and the surrounding membranes help protect the brain, a head injury may include an injury to the brain.

Industry Organizations Respond

The industry heard the warnings and saw the red flags. On Sept. 7, 2004, the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) entered into a national agreement with its International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) labor partner to provide a national substance-abuse policy.

The Rules of the Road

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently published some startling statistics. Every 12 minutes, someone dies in a motor vehicle crash. An injury occurs every 10 seconds, and every five seconds, a crash occurs.

Self-Taught Safety

In theory, lockout/tagout (LOTO) is a simple concept. Basically, you disconnect equipment or circuits from their energy source and put a lock or tag in place, so no one can connect the equipment while you work. This should control any hazardous energy to which employees will be exposed.

Ladder Safety School

On the morning of October 9, 1996, a 34-year-old male electrician apprentice was fatally injured in a fall from an extension ladder. The California Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (CA/FACE) was contacted to conduct an investigation.