Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

More on Safety

 
Put It Out

Fires and burns are the fifth most common cause of accidental injury and death in the United States. Of these, most victims of fires die from smoke or toxic gas inhalation, not from the flames themselves. Many deaths can be avoided by the proper use of a portable fire extinguisher.


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Preventative Medicine

According to the Centers for Disease Control, more than 75 percent of an employer’s healthcare costs and productivity losses can be attributed to employees’ lifestyles. This has led to a trend in corporate America to focus on health and wellness.


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Understanding the Unseen

The work electrical contractors do every day poses some obvious, inherent safety risks. After all, few jobs are riskier than those involving live electrical wires. However, electrical contractors also face a number of hidden hazards that, over time, could be every bit as deadly as arcing current.


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The Electrical Big Ten

Many statistics are recorded and collected in the construction field— injury, illness, fatality and most frequently cited violations, to name a few.


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Safe at Home

Perhaps one of the most traumatic things that can happen to a construction company is a job site fatality. It affects many aspects of the company, from finances to employee morale.


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Change Is in the Air

During the 2008 presidential election, we heard a lot about the need for change. Over the last few months, we all experienced change of a different nature, a kind none of us wanted. Our faith in those who ran or are running large financial and industrial institutions has dropped to new lows.


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The Visual Inspection

The calls vary, but all have a similar theme: “My fire alarm system needs work. Can you help?” Of course, the answer is always yes. But professional contractors know they must make a thorough investigation of the installed system before determining the scope of the work.


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