Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In recent years, the number of counterfeit consumer safety products and electronic components has grown exponentially in the United States. The problem has become so widespread that counterfeit airplane parts were even found in Air Force One.

The new year may not be here just yet, but the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) is! And with it comes new requirements to help protect workers from arc-flash hazards.


On November 17, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule updating Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment (Fall Protection Systems) standards in general industries such as building management services, utilities, warehousing, retail, windo

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on www.ecmag.com.


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OSHA Combats New York City Construction Hazards

In New York City, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is taking new steps to combat the rise in construction fatalities, where 20 employees have died in construction-related accidents since January 2008.


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A Guide to EAPs

According to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the number of declared major disasters nearly doubled in the 1990s compared to the previous decade. This increase brings into focus the need and benefits of being prepared. But the DHS is not alone in its concern and call for preparedness.


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See the Hazard

In previous columns, we have emphasized the importance of the planning function for the electrical construction supervisor. In like fashion, we recently underscored various important aspects of the supervisor’s role in safety.


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Necessary Chemistry

A material safety data sheet (MSDS)—a component of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Hazard Communication standard—provides workers and emergency responders with safe procedures for handling or working with a particular substance.


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Safety Patrol

Last month, we considered identification, analysis and elimination or mitigation of unsafe job site conditions. However, safety for any construction worker should become a habit.


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Sun Protection

When consturction industry insiders are asked to give examples of personal protective equipment (PPE), the list usually includes a hard hat, eye protection, hearing protection, gloves and steel-toed shoes or boots.


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Taking the First Step

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, falls are the No. 1 killer in the construction industry and the second leading killer in private industry. In contrast to this well-known statistic, employers have always had the responsibility for solving fall hazards at their job sites.


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