Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

Arc flash boundary


This is the fourth article in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc-flash hazard calculations. The first three parts appeared in the January, March and May 2016 issues of Electrical Contractor and can be found at www.ecmag.com.
 Arc flash boundary


If you don’t agree that a fire alarm system is more than a fire alarm system, you should probably revisit Chapter 21, Emergency Control Function Interfaces, in NFPA 72 2016, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

Slips, trips and falls are leading causes of death in the workplace. In addition, they account for more than 1 million hospital visits nationwide each year, resulting in thousands of disabling injuries. Many of these incidents can be prevented by adhering to some basic safety protocols.

More on Safety

 
See the Hazard

In previous columns, we have emphasized the importance of the planning function for the electrical construction supervisor. In like fashion, we recently underscored various important aspects of the supervisor’s role in safety.


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Necessary Chemistry

A material safety data sheet (MSDS)—a component of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Hazard Communication standard—provides workers and emergency responders with safe procedures for handling or working with a particular substance.


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Safety Patrol

Last month, we considered identification, analysis and elimination or mitigation of unsafe job site conditions. However, safety for any construction worker should become a habit.


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Sun Protection

When consturction industry insiders are asked to give examples of personal protective equipment (PPE), the list usually includes a hard hat, eye protection, hearing protection, gloves and steel-toed shoes or boots.


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Taking the First Step

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, falls are the No. 1 killer in the construction industry and the second leading killer in private industry. In contrast to this well-known statistic, employers have always had the responsibility for solving fall hazards at their job sites.


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OSHA to Hold Public Hearing on Confined Spaces Rule
by Staff |

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) announced in the April 21, 2008, Federal Register that it would hold an informal public hearing to receive testimony and documentary evidence on the proposed rule for Confined Spaces in Construction. The hearing is scheduled for 10 a.m.


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Plug It Up

Tamper-resistant receptacles will significantly reduce the number of injuries that result when someone inserts a foreign object into receptacles within a residential occupancy.


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