Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In October, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released an updated set of Recommended Practices for Safety and Health programs, bringing the original guidelines from 1989 into the 21st century.

Every day, More than 2,000 people incur job-related eye injuries that require medical treatment. It is estimated that proper eye and face protection can prevent 90 percent of these injuries.

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.

More on Safety

Fire Proof

Throughout US history, there have been near-legendary workplace fires. In 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City caused 150 deaths. As recently as 1991, a fire at the Imperial Foods poultry processing plant in North Carolina caused 25 worker deaths and 49 injuries.

A Partnership That Works Still Has Much Work to Do

The chance of an average worker sustaining a fatal injury on the job is slim. There were just 3.7 fatal occupational injuries per 100,000 workers in the United States in 2007, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

GIs and Contractors Electrocuted in Iraq
by Staff |

Recent electrical incidents in Iraq have stirred up controversy. In August, Sen. Bob Casey (D-Pa.) issued a statement that the victim count stood at 18. Casey reported that 16 were U.S. military personnel, and two were U.S. contractors.

The Cutting Edge of Education

It's hard to identify what's new in safety training. Whether your attention is drawn to technique or topic, the message seems to be repetitive year after year. Toolbox talks are useful. Advances in technology increase training possibilities.

OSHA Combats New York City Construction Hazards

In New York City, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is taking new steps to combat the rise in construction fatalities, where 20 employees have died in construction-related accidents since January 2008.

A Guide to EAPs

According to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the number of declared major disasters nearly doubled in the 1990s compared to the previous decade. This increase brings into focus the need and benefits of being prepared. But the DHS is not alone in its concern and call for preparedness.

See the Hazard

In previous columns, we have emphasized the importance of the planning function for the electrical construction supervisor. In like fashion, we recently underscored various important aspects of the supervisor’s role in safety.