Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Nearly 30 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous noise every year. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that more than 125,000 workers have suffered significant or permanent hearing loss since 2004.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has standards addressing electrical hazards, yet hundreds of fatalities and thousands of injuries still occur as a result of electric shock, electrocution, arc flash and arc blast each year.

Everyone tenses up in anticipation as they hear the countdown, “three, two, one.” Then there’s an extremely loud BOOM and blinding light. Sparks fly everywhere, and smoke fills the test area. Laughter and perhaps even a high five frequently follow. 


Fatal Four


You are probably thinking this is yet another lecture about electrical safety. While focusing each May on safety is important, we should care about it every day. Unfortunately, preventable injuries and fatalities often occur when people fail to practice electrical safety.


More on Safety

 
Apply the Brakes
| under

Ensure your safety with a pre-trip inspection   Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death and injury for all ages. Crashes occurring on the job have profound financial effects on employees, their families, coworkers and employers.

READ MORE
 
Changes Long Overdue
| under

Subpart V revisions and line construction The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 444 serious injuries and 74 fatalities occur annually among employees involved in electric power generation, transmission and distribution work.

READ MORE
 
Passing the Test
| under

Choosing and using test equipment correctly is critical There are no proven tricks or shortcutsthat will estimate the voltage in a circuit. Qualified workers must use a tester to determine if the wires or equipment are energized.

READ MORE
 
Critical Elements
| under

There are a limited number and amount of chemicals that electricians use to perform their work. Wire lubricants, contact cleaners, etc., are used in sparing quantities. However, the number and variety of substances they can be exposed to is unlimited.

READ MORE
 
Heat, Sunshine and Safety
| under

It is common knowledge that too much sun and heat are dangerous. What electrical contractors may find surprising is the impact of these hazards and the control the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) may exercise over an employer for providing protection.

READ MORE
 
OSHA Update 2006
| under

As usual, there is much to report on changes involving the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). New legislation has been proposed, advances have been made on proposed regulations, and new cooperative programs and materials have been created.

READ MORE
 
Are You Safer at Work?
| under

Accidents are one of the leading causes of death in the United States, but the majority of accidents do not occur at work.

READ MORE

Pages