Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The likelihood of getting inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is pretty low. In fact, each year, state and federal agencies conduct roughly only 100,000 job site inspections.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has had general industry and shipyard standards regulating work in confined spaces for years. Those regulations require employers to determine which safety measures and procedures must be established for work to occur.

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.

As the dangers of arc flash have become better known, the market for arc-rated (AR) clothing has grown. Unlike earlier offerings, many of today’s garments can be comfortable to wear on a daily basis.

More on Safety

 
The Rules of the Road

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently published some startling statistics. Every 12 minutes, someone dies in a motor vehicle crash. An injury occurs every 10 seconds, and every five seconds, a crash occurs.


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Self-Taught Safety

In theory, lockout/tagout (LOTO) is a simple concept. Basically, you disconnect equipment or circuits from their energy source and put a lock or tag in place, so no one can connect the equipment while you work. This should control any hazardous energy to which employees will be exposed.


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Ladder Safety School

On the morning of October 9, 1996, a 34-year-old male electrician apprentice was fatally injured in a fall from an extension ladder. The California Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (CA/FACE) was contacted to conduct an investigation.


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When a Little is Too Much

Drug and alcohol problems exist at work with great frequency.


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OSHA Offers Tips to Protect Yourself from Cold Weather
by Staff |

Some areas of the nation have already experienced the harsh, sometimes damaging effects of winter.


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The Eyes Have It

Imagine working in construction with limited or no vision. Try walking across the site with your eyes closed—not easy. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates 2,000 eye injuries occur every day at work.


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What's Happening at OSHA

Inspections and citations are down. Little activity has occurred on the advancement of new regulations. In addition, if we look at the proposed budget for 2008, funding seems inappropriate to keep pace with rising costs.


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