Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.

As the dangers of arc flash have become better known, the market for arc-rated (AR) clothing has grown. Unlike earlier offerings, many of today’s garments can be comfortable to wear on a daily basis.

With winter rapidly approaching, it is important to protect workers from the coming cold temperatures and potential extreme weather. Prolonged exposure to these conditions can result in serious health problems, including trench foot, hypothermia and frostbite.

In all likelihood, you will never be involved in a scenario involving an intruder or active shooter in the workplace. But in the event you find yourself in this situation, this article provides basic background and awareness information on how to respond.

More on Safety

Creating a Drug-Testing Policy

Illicit drugs and alcohol are leading contributors to injuries and deaths on job sites, and the electrical construction industry is encouraging drug testing to head off this dangerous trend. The highest rates of drug use are found in the construction trades.

Strike Force

Here's a statistic: Lightning strikes the United States more than 25 million times each year. Sadly, these strikes are responsible for nearly 500 deaths and more than 2,000 injuries.

The Power of Safety

After OSHA performs an inspection, it may issue citations for any violations. Citations must be in writing and describe the nature of the violation. Congress created OSHA on Dec.

Heads Up

While the thick, hard bones of the skull and the surrounding membranes help protect the brain, a head injury may include an injury to the brain.

Industry Organizations Respond

The industry heard the warnings and saw the red flags. On Sept. 7, 2004, the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) entered into a national agreement with its International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) labor partner to provide a national substance-abuse policy.

The Rules of the Road

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently published some startling statistics. Every 12 minutes, someone dies in a motor vehicle crash. An injury occurs every 10 seconds, and every five seconds, a crash occurs.

Self-Taught Safety

In theory, lockout/tagout (LOTO) is a simple concept. Basically, you disconnect equipment or circuits from their energy source and put a lock or tag in place, so no one can connect the equipment while you work. This should control any hazardous energy to which employees will be exposed.