Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

One of the more popular American show-business legends is the one about P.T. Barnum and the egress. In 1841, Barnum launched his American Museum at the corner of Broadway and Ann Street in Lower Manhattan.

Recently, a fire occurred in an 11-story apartment that primarily housed elderly people, although it was not labeled as a senior living building. Six people died and multiple people were injured as a result of the fire.

“You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” That famous song lyric can be appropriately applied to the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E. What is gone? Zero is no longer one of the hazard/risk categories (HRCs).

Conducting preventative maintenance on a car is much more effective and less costly than making repairs after it breaks down. The same goes for occupational safety. Unfortunately, for many years, employers have used lagging indicators as their safety strategy.

Electrical Contractor Magazine

More on Safety

 
Industry Organizations Respond
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The industry heard the warnings and saw the red flags. On Sept. 7, 2004, the National Electrical Contractors Association (NECA) entered into a national agreement with its International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) labor partner to provide a national substance-abuse policy.

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The Rules of the Road
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently published some startling statistics. Every 12 minutes, someone dies in a motor vehicle crash. An injury occurs every 10 seconds, and every five seconds, a crash occurs.

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Self-Taught Safety
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In theory, lockout/tagout (LOTO) is a simple concept. Basically, you disconnect equipment or circuits from their energy source and put a lock or tag in place, so no one can connect the equipment while you work. This should control any hazardous energy to which employees will be exposed.

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Ladder Safety School
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On the morning of October 9, 1996, a 34-year-old male electrician apprentice was fatally injured in a fall from an extension ladder. The California Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (CA/FACE) was contacted to conduct an investigation.

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When a Little is Too Much
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Drug and alcohol problems exist at work with great frequency.

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OSHA Offers Tips to Protect Yourself from Cold Weather
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Some areas of the nation have already experienced the harsh, sometimes damaging effects of winter.

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The Eyes Have It
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Imagine working in construction with limited or no vision. Try walking across the site with your eyes closed—not easy. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) estimates 2,000 eye injuries occur every day at work.

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