Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Properly” and “Maintained”—these two words always come up when discussing arc flash hazards. Why? Because protective devices such as circuit breakers and relays that have not been properly maintained may not operate as quickly as they should.

There are many frequently asked questions about performing an arc-flash study (risk assessment) and understanding electrical safety requirements. A careful read of standards such as NPFA 70E or IEEE 1584 can answer some questions. Yet, other questions can be more complex.

The first thing that comes to mind when thinking of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is government regulation compliance.

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

More on Safety

The Cutting Edge of Education

It's hard to identify what's new in safety training. Whether your attention is drawn to technique or topic, the message seems to be repetitive year after year. Toolbox talks are useful. Advances in technology increase training possibilities.

OSHA Combats New York City Construction Hazards
by Staff |

In New York City, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is taking new steps to combat the rise in construction fatalities, where 20 employees have died in construction-related accidents since January 2008.

A Guide to EAPs

According to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the number of declared major disasters nearly doubled in the 1990s compared to the previous decade. This increase brings into focus the need and benefits of being prepared. But the DHS is not alone in its concern and call for preparedness.

See the Hazard

In previous columns, we have emphasized the importance of the planning function for the electrical construction supervisor. In like fashion, we recently underscored various important aspects of the supervisor’s role in safety.

Necessary Chemistry

A material safety data sheet (MSDS)—a component of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration’s Hazard Communication standard—provides workers and emergency responders with safe procedures for handling or working with a particular substance.

Sun Protection

When consturction industry insiders are asked to give examples of personal protective equipment (PPE), the list usually includes a hard hat, eye protection, hearing protection, gloves and steel-toed shoes or boots.

Safety Patrol

Last month, we considered identification, analysis and elimination or mitigation of unsafe job site conditions. However, safety for any construction worker should become a habit.