Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

The dog days of summer are upon us. It is vacation season, and employees are likely to spend more time outdoors on home-improvement projects and other leisure activities. With so much emphasis on job safety, it’s easy to forget that most injuries and illnesses actually happen away from work.

I’ve heard it all before. “What were they thinking when they wrote this standard? If I were them, this is how I would have done it.” When it comes to arc flash and electrical safety standards, complaints, armchair quarterbacking and second-guessing follow as soon as the latest edition comes out.

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.

More on Safety

 
Remember the Basics
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Tools, both hand and power, are found at every job site regardless of the trade. While tools are a craftsman’s friends, they bring hazards. The same tool that makes a job easier also can be the cause of an accident.

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Fire Proof
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Throughout US history, there have been near-legendary workplace fires. In 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City caused 150 deaths. As recently as 1991, a fire at the Imperial Foods poultry processing plant in North Carolina caused 25 worker deaths and 49 injuries.

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A Partnership That Works Still Has Much Work to Do
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The chance of an average worker sustaining a fatal injury on the job is slim. There were just 3.7 fatal occupational injuries per 100,000 workers in the United States in 2007, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

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GIs and Contractors Electrocuted in Iraq
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Recent electrical incidents in Iraq have stirred up controversy. In August, Sen. Bob Casey (D-Pa.) issued a statement that the victim count stood at 18. Casey reported that 16 were U.S. military personnel, and two were U.S. contractors.

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The Cutting Edge of Education
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It's hard to identify what's new in safety training. Whether your attention is drawn to technique or topic, the message seems to be repetitive year after year. Toolbox talks are useful. Advances in technology increase training possibilities.

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OSHA Combats New York City Construction Hazards
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In New York City, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is taking new steps to combat the rise in construction fatalities, where 20 employees have died in construction-related accidents since January 2008.

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A Guide to EAPs
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According to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the number of declared major disasters nearly doubled in the 1990s compared to the previous decade. This increase brings into focus the need and benefits of being prepared. But the DHS is not alone in its concern and call for preparedness.

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