Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Properly” and “Maintained”—these two words always come up when discussing arc flash hazards. Why? Because protective devices such as circuit breakers and relays that have not been properly maintained may not operate as quickly as they should.

There are many frequently asked questions about performing an arc-flash study (risk assessment) and understanding electrical safety requirements. A careful read of standards such as NPFA 70E or IEEE 1584 can answer some questions. Yet, other questions can be more complex.

The first thing that comes to mind when thinking of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is government regulation compliance.

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

More on Safety

Cycles of Safety

Millions of people spend a significant portion of their lives working in high-rise office buildings.

Portable Hazards

Portable generators supply electricity where none is available. They commonly are used following natural disasters and at construction sites. Portable generators produce electricity with an internal combustion engine that is run on a fuel source, usually gasoline, diesel, kerosene or propane.

Risk of Home Fires Rises as Life Expectancy, Energy Consumption Increase
by Staff |

Home electrical fires cause more than 500 deaths, 1,400 injuries, and $1.4 billion in property damage each year. According to a report recently released by the U.S.

Remember the Basics

Tools, both hand and power, are found at every job site regardless of the trade. While tools are a craftsman’s friends, they bring hazards. The same tool that makes a job easier also can be the cause of an accident.

Fire Proof

Throughout US history, there have been near-legendary workplace fires. In 1911, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City caused 150 deaths. As recently as 1991, a fire at the Imperial Foods poultry processing plant in North Carolina caused 25 worker deaths and 49 injuries.

A Partnership That Works Still Has Much Work to Do

The chance of an average worker sustaining a fatal injury on the job is slim. There were just 3.7 fatal occupational injuries per 100,000 workers in the United States in 2007, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

GIs and Contractors Electrocuted in Iraq
by Staff |

Recent electrical incidents in Iraq have stirred up controversy. In August, Sen. Bob Casey (D-Pa.) issued a statement that the victim count stood at 18. Casey reported that 16 were U.S. military personnel, and two were U.S. contractors.