Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

On a daily basis, we hear sounds and noise in our environment from a variety of sources, such as television, radio, household appliances and traffic. However, these everyday sounds are usually at a safe volume.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is gearing up for some aggressive policy goals in the coming year. Its regulatory agenda furthers progress on a series of existing initiatives and some new areas of focus.

Moving materials around a work site is part of everyday life for an electrician or wireman. Unfortunately, the simple acts of pushing, pulling and lifting objects are extremely hazardous when they are not executed properly. Far too often, they result in costly injuries.

Obtain the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E


New Year’s Resolutions are easy to make but difficult to keep. There is still time to make a few late resolutions. Here are 10 such resolutions for electrical safety that should be made (and kept) for 2015. They may just save a life.
 Obtain the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E


More on Safety

 
Defensive Driving
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Nearly 40 percent of all occupational deaths occur as a result of transportation-related incidents. A majority of them occur in traffic work zones. Many are not road construction workers but rather tradespeople, including electrical workers, who must work in or near roadways.

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Point Of Contact
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In recent years, thousands of occupational fatalities and injuries have occurred as a result of electrical contact. Many of these accidents happen when workers do not use the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for the job or they use it improperly.

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System upgrades, short-circuit current

Why Does It Change?
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It goes up. It goes down. Sometimes, it is thought to be infinite (although it isn’t), and other times, it seems impossible to find. The available short-circuit current from the electric utility is one of the more important pieces of information for an arc flash hazard calculation study.

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Require No Fire
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Fires and explosions in the workplace result in nearly 200 fatalities and injure some 5,000 workers every year. The resulting costs of such incidents reach more than $2 billion annually.

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Slips, Trips And Falls
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Slips, trips and falls are the second leading cause of death in the workplace and account for more than 1 million hospital visits in the United States each year. During the winter months, hazardous weather conditions greatly increase the risk for such incidents.

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OSHA Outlook 2014
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The current economic climate in Washington, D.C., is uncertain at best. Last minute approval of the federal budget in late December would seem to offer a little more insight into how the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will operate in 2014.

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Such As ...
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Two simple words, a total of six letters, help define which electrical equipment is required to have an arc flash label. Although these two words are used with good intentions, they can often leave a person second-guessing themselves.


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