Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

The dog days of summer are upon us. It is vacation season, and employees are likely to spend more time outdoors on home-improvement projects and other leisure activities. With so much emphasis on job safety, it’s easy to forget that most injuries and illnesses actually happen away from work.

I’ve heard it all before. “What were they thinking when they wrote this standard? If I were them, this is how I would have done it.” When it comes to arc flash and electrical safety standards, complaints, armchair quarterbacking and second-guessing follow as soon as the latest edition comes out.

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.

More on Safety

 
Arc rating only

Label Enabled
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“What do you mean we need to relabel the electrical equipment? Didn’t we just do this a few years ago?”


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Web Exclusive
How Engaged Is Your 'Management' With 'Safety on The Job'?
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We have heard from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the industry that, for a safety program to be effective, management must be involved. What does that mean? Do they only fund the program? Does management hire just one person to oversee safety?

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Stay Ahead Of The Spark
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The leading cause of residential fires in the United States each year—and the second leading cause of nonresidential fires—is electrical failure and malfunction.

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Hot, Humid And Healthy
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During the summer, hot weather increases the risk for heat-related injuries and illnesses. Since 2008, more than 100 workers have been killed on the job as a result of heat stress.

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Raise Your Right Hand
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Attorney: “Can you tell us how Mr. Smith died?”
 Witness: “There was an electrical explosion. Something went wrong when he was working on the panel. A big fireball shot out that caught his clothing on fire. It was horrible.”


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Beg Your Pardon?
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Nearly 30 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous noise every year. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that more than 125,000 workers have suffered significant or permanent hearing loss since 2004.

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Fatal Four

Pearls of Culture: Unsafe Behavior
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You are probably thinking this is yet another lecture about electrical safety. While focusing each May on safety is important, we should care about it every day. Unfortunately, preventable injuries and fatalities often occur when people fail to practice electrical safety.


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