Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

With the constant emphasis on workplace safety from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, it’s easy to forget the hazards that exist in our everyday lives. In fact, people are six times more likely to suffer an injury away from work.

UPDATE: OSHA has delayed the deadline by an additional two weeks until Dec. 15. Click here for the official announcement from OSHA.

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

More on Safety

 
Sanford Heart Hospital
Do No Harm: Healthcare Projects 
and ECs

Electrical contractors working in healthcare facilities must adhere to rigorous safety protocols, the National Electrical Code and cleanliness standards often tougher than those imposed in other types of projects.


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Safety Is A Lifestyle

The term “safe” is defined as a state that is secure from the liability to harm, injury, danger or risk. The basic condition of being safe involves actions taken to remain protected or guarded from danger and to reduce risks to the lowest possible level.


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The JATC of Greater Boston’s training room is stocked with essential PPE.
Cool Tools: Personal Protective Equipment

The Electrical trade is one of the most dangerous to work in. Electricians face the usual hazards found on most job sites, and the additional risk of electrical shock can cause serious injuries and death.



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Lowering Limits: Changes to Beryllium Exposure Requirements 


The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued a final rule modifying a 40-year-old standard pertaining to exposure to beryllium and beryllium compounds. It contains new requirements for general, construction and shipyard industries.


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ALI Sponsors National Ladder Safety Month With Industry Support

The first-ever National Ladder Safety Month, sponsored by the American Ladder Institute (ALI), is taking place this month. According to the ALI, the event is "the only movement dedicated exclusively to the promotion of ladder safety, at home and at work.


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Hidden In Plain Sight: Hazardous Energy in the Workplace


Electrical energy is the most common hazardous energy in the workplace. For electricians, linemen and wiremen, it likely is the most familiar. However, hazardous energy comes in many forms, including mechanical, chemical, nuclear, pneumatic, hydraulic and gravitational.


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Line In The Sand: The 40 Calories Per Square Centimeter Dilemma


It’s the same old story. An arc flash study was just completed, and the calculated incident energy exceeds 40 calories per square centimeter (cal/cm2) in many locations. When this happens, people often just shake their head and ask, “Now what do we do?”



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