Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

More than 2 million construction workers, or 65 percent of the construction industry, work on scaffolds every day. Scaffold accidents cause thousands of injuries and are involved in many job-site fatalities each year.

Credit Edwin J. Torres Mayoral Photography Office

Following a surge in job-site deaths, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has signed into law a contentious bill requiring construction workers to receive more safety training. Workers on most construction sites will now need to receive at least 40 hours of additional safety training.

Arc flash events occur every single day in the United States, and some of them result in a fatality or severe burns for the victim.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), distracted driving causes more than 3,000 deaths and nearly 400,000 injuries each year. Automobile accidents also account for more work-related fatalities than any other cause.

More on Safety

 
Making Sense of the Numbers

One of the first steps in performing an arc flash hazard calculation study is to request the short-circuit data from the electric utility company.


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Everyone on the Same Label

Since the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom 2012) passed into law in March, many have discussed the modifications and impact on workers worldwide. One of the areas of major change involves the labeling of hazardous chemicals used at the work site.


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Mark of Safety

From marking equipment and conductors at the factory to field-marking with signs where electrical hazards exist, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of marking requirements in the National Electrical Code (NEC).


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NFPA 70E 2012 Marks Full Year of Improving Safety and Adding Value

As previously reported, the second annual NECA Safety Professionals Conference (NSPC) started with a big bang—a series of them, in fact. I am referring to the live arc flash demonstration at the Cooper Bussmann Paul P. Gubany Center for High Power Technology that opened the conference in St. Louis.


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Smithsonian Reaches Out for Help on Educational Electrical Video Production

With the impending generational shift of workers in the electrical industry, it is becoming more important to get young people interested in electricity to replace the retiring ranks.


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Injury and Illness Prevention Programs

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) prides itself in the fact that, since the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, job-related casualties and injuries have been reduced by more than 60 percent.


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Not Me! How Shocking!

OUCH! I can’t believe I just did that. While trimming the hedge at home one afternoon, I moved the orange extension cord around one of the bushes. Simple enough—being a very safety conscious person, I wanted to ensure I did not accidently cut it.


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