Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Moving materials around a work site is part of everyday life for an electrician or wireman. Unfortunately, the simple acts of pushing, pulling and lifting objects are extremely hazardous when they are not executed properly. Far too often, they result in costly injuries.

Obtain the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E


New Year’s Resolutions are easy to make but difficult to keep. There is still time to make a few late resolutions. Here are 10 such resolutions for electrical safety that should be made (and kept) for 2015. They may just save a life.
 Obtain the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E


In 2013, there were 796 on-the-job fatalities in the construction industry, 294 of which were caused by falls. Additionally, improper fall protection is one of the most cited violations on job sites by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 5 million U.S. workers are required to wear respirators. For linemen and wiremen, respirators protect against environments with insufficient oxygen levels, harmful airborne dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases, vapors and sprays.

More on Safety

 
Keep Your Hands to Yourself!
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Just about anyone working on a job site, as well as most do-it-yourselfers, has experienced an injury caused by a hand tool. Many seem to expect a minor injury, such as a scrape or a bang on a knuckle.

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Followers Not Leaders
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Typically, contractors know what codes and standards are in force in their market areas, and if they don’t, they should find out. But often this is limited to the code they use the most, the National Electrical Code (NEC).

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Catch-22
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A Catch-22 occurs when circumstances emerge that place one in a no-win situation; let’s take a look at an arc flash safety Catch-22.

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Keep up Your Defenses
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Health topics made headlines in 2009: H1N1 flu, the seasonal flu and their prevention, and no one wants to get these illnesses because they are uncomfortable, inconvenient and, in certain cases, deadly.

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Every Statistic Has a Name
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Right in front of you on the switchboard, a bright orange label reads: “WARNING Arc Flash Hazard, Appropriate PPE Required.” As you look closer at the label, you also see: “6.5 cal/cm2 at a working distance of 18 inches.”

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Fear of Heights
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), along with many other organizations, has invested large amounts of time and money to increase the safety of workers who perform tasks at height.

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Strobe Code Compliance 101
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Most contractors install strobe lights to comply with the National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code by simply using a combination audible-visible appliance everywhere one or the other is shown on the plans.

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