Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The first-ever National Ladder Safety Month, sponsored by the American Ladder Institute (ALI), is taking place this month. According to the ALI, the event is "the only movement dedicated exclusively to the promotion of ladder safety, at home and at work.

Electrical energy is the most common hazardous energy in the workplace. For electricians, linemen and wiremen, it likely is the most familiar. However, hazardous energy comes in many forms, including mechanical, chemical, nuclear, pneumatic, hydraulic and gravitational.

It’s the same old story. An arc flash study was just completed, and the calculated incident energy exceeds 40 calories per square centimeter (cal/cm2) in many locations. When this happens, people often just shake their head and ask, “Now what do we do?”


by
Staff  

Since their inclusion in the National Electrical Code (NEC), arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) have brought greater protection to homes, many of which are increasingly overwhelmed by the growing electrical demands of our high-tech and appliance-rich lifestyles.

More on Safety

 
Thunderstorms

Enduring Mother Nature: Summer Storm Safety


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.


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Arc flash boundary

Arc Flash Boundary

This is the fourth article in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc-flash hazard calculations. The first three parts appeared in the January, March and May 2016 issues of Electrical Contractor and can be found at www.ecmag.com.
 Arc flash boundary



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Many Systems, One Control

If you don’t agree that a fire alarm system is more than a fire alarm system, you should probably revisit Chapter 21, Emergency Control Function Interfaces, in NFPA 72 2016, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.


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Staying Upright: Slips, Trips and Falls

Slips, trips and falls are leading causes of death in the workplace. In addition, they account for more than 1 million hospital visits nationwide each year, resulting in thousands of disabling injuries. Many of these incidents can be prevented by adhering to some basic safety protocols.


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Important Modifications: Proposed changes to silica regulations

On March 25, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) published its final rule, updating the more than 40-year-old standard addressing respirable crystalline silica exposure limits and other silica-related hazards.


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Watching Out For You: Collision Prevention

Collisions between workers and vehicles are some of the most expensive incidents on a work site. Beyond the most important form of defense—having diligent and well-trained workers on-site—some contractors use digital solutions to prevent collisions.


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Who's At Fault? Avoiding workplace accidents

It might surprise most people to learn that 97 percent of all unintentional injury-related deaths—and 87 percent of all medically consulted unintentional injuries—actually occur off the job.



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