Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The likelihood of getting inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is pretty low. In fact, each year, state and federal agencies conduct roughly only 100,000 job site inspections.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has had general industry and shipyard standards regulating work in confined spaces for years. Those regulations require employers to determine which safety measures and procedures must be established for work to occur.

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.

As the dangers of arc flash have become better known, the market for arc-rated (AR) clothing has grown. Unlike earlier offerings, many of today’s garments can be comfortable to wear on a daily basis.

More on Safety

 
Every Line Of Defense

This article expands on “Control the Risk” (ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, March 2015). It addresses six key areas in the risk-control hierarchy and how each can be used to reduce the risk associated with the arc flash hazard.


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Know Your Arc: DC arc flash calculations

More than a century ago, two giants in the fledgling electrical power industry battled it out for supremacy. The conflict, sometimes referred to as “The War of the Currents,” would define whether electric power systems would use alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC).


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Dickies Workwear Antrim Super Safety Boot has a steel toe cap and a midsole.
Feet On The Ground

Electrocutions are consistently one of the leading causes of workplace fatalities and are a daily hazard for electricians and linemen. As such, various forms of personal protective equipment (PPE) can be worn to prevent direct contact with live wires or energized equipment.


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You Lift Me Up

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 25 people are killed and many others are injured each year in accidents involving aerial lifts. This includes scissor lifts and boom-supported lifts, such as bucket trucks and cherry pickers.


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Loud Noises: Hearing conservation and protection


On a daily basis, we hear sounds and noise in our environment from a variety of sources, such as television, radio, household appliances and traffic. However, these everyday sounds are usually at a safe volume.


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The Challenges Ahead: OSHA Outlook

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is gearing up for some aggressive policy goals in the coming year. Its regulatory agenda furthers progress on a series of existing initiatives and some new areas of focus.


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Move It: Safe and proper material handling


Moving materials around a work site is part of everyday life for an electrician or wireman. Unfortunately, the simple acts of pushing, pulling and lifting objects are extremely hazardous when they are not executed properly. Far too often, they result in costly injuries.


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