Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In recent years, the number of counterfeit consumer safety products and electronic components has grown exponentially in the United States. The problem has become so widespread that counterfeit airplane parts were even found in Air Force One.

The new year may not be here just yet, but the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) is! And with it comes new requirements to help protect workers from arc-flash hazards.


On November 17, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule updating Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment (Fall Protection Systems) standards in general industries such as building management services, utilities, warehousing, retail, windo

In October, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released an updated set of Recommended Practices for Safety and Health programs, bringing the original guidelines from 1989 into the 21st century.

More on Safety

 
Fire Fighters: The arc of safety bends toward AFCIs

Once a bedroom-only requirement, arc-fault 
circuit interrupters (AFCIs)­—either as breakers or receptacles—today are required in almost all areas of the home.


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People In The Equation: Understanding the implications 
of installation and design


Addressable fire alarm systems are the typical choice for new installations. The programmability gives designers and installers an astounding array of operational features. However, occupants may not understand their responsibilities or how to interpret an alarm. 



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Incident-Energy Calculations

This article is the third in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. Parts 1 and 2 appeared in the January and March 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, respectively.


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Saving The Day

Wiremen and linemen face more than twice the mortality rate of police officers or firefighters. Due to being in a confined position, many deaths and injuries occur while workers are on top of utility poles and in elevated bucket trucks.


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The Brain Game: On-the-Job Head Protection


Head injuries account for thousands of on-the-job injuries and many preventable fatalities each year. Struck-by hazards are also one of the leading types of occupational injuries in the construction industry.


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OSHA Announces Final Rule on Silica Dust Protection

Bringing to a close a long, controversial safety stand-off in the construction industry, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) today announced a final rule on respirable silica dust.


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An Elevated Threat: Ladder Safety

In recent years, ladder-related injuries have been on the rise. It is estimated that more than 90,000 people are hospitalized annually as a result. Additionally, roughly 700 occupational deaths are attributed each year to elevated falls.


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