Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Properly” and “Maintained”—these two words always come up when discussing arc flash hazards. Why? Because protective devices such as circuit breakers and relays that have not been properly maintained may not operate as quickly as they should.

There are many frequently asked questions about performing an arc-flash study (risk assessment) and understanding electrical safety requirements. A careful read of standards such as NPFA 70E or IEEE 1584 can answer some questions. Yet, other questions can be more complex.

The first thing that comes to mind when thinking of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is government regulation compliance.

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

More on Safety

Move It: Safe and proper material handling

Moving materials around a work site is part of everyday life for an electrician or wireman. Unfortunately, the simple acts of pushing, pulling and lifting objects are extremely hazardous when they are not executed properly. Far too often, they result in costly injuries.

Obtain the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E

10 New Year's Resolutions

New Year’s Resolutions are easy to make but difficult to keep. There is still time to make a few late resolutions. Here are 10 such resolutions for electrical safety that should be made (and kept) for 2015. They may just save a life.
 Obtain the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E

The First Step Is A Doozy

In 2013, there were 796 on-the-job fatalities in the construction industry, 294 of which were caused by falls. Additionally, improper fall protection is one of the most cited violations on job sites by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Just Breathe

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 5 million U.S. workers are required to wear respirators. For linemen and wiremen, respirators protect against environments with insufficient oxygen levels, harmful airborne dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases, vapors and sprays.

Dangerous Ground

An arc-flash study should not be thought of simply as an item that needs to be checked off the list. However, many people still view it this way.

I Feel So Confined

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 

Will The Owner Know?

As a contractor, you bid on numerous fire alarm system projects based on plans and specifications developed by an engineer. You assume the engineer has discussed such things as quality and reliability with the owner because the specifications focus on those issues.