Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

More than 2 million construction workers, or 65 percent of the construction industry, work on scaffolds every day. Scaffold accidents cause thousands of injuries and are involved in many job-site fatalities each year.

Credit Edwin J. Torres Mayoral Photography Office

Following a surge in job-site deaths, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio has signed into law a contentious bill requiring construction workers to receive more safety training. Workers on most construction sites will now need to receive at least 40 hours of additional safety training.

Arc flash events occur every single day in the United States, and some of them result in a fatality or severe burns for the victim.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), distracted driving causes more than 3,000 deaths and nearly 400,000 injuries each year. Automobile accidents also account for more work-related fatalities than any other cause.

More on Safety

 
Sanford Heart Hospital
Do No Harm: Healthcare Projects 
and ECs

Electrical contractors working in healthcare facilities must adhere to rigorous safety protocols, the National Electrical Code and cleanliness standards often tougher than those imposed in other types of projects.


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Safety Is A Lifestyle

The term “safe” is defined as a state that is secure from the liability to harm, injury, danger or risk. The basic condition of being safe involves actions taken to remain protected or guarded from danger and to reduce risks to the lowest possible level.


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The JATC of Greater Boston’s training room is stocked with essential PPE.
Cool Tools: Personal Protective Equipment

The Electrical trade is one of the most dangerous to work in. Electricians face the usual hazards found on most job sites, and the additional risk of electrical shock can cause serious injuries and death.



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AGC of America Emphasizing Highway Work Zone Safety

The Associated General Contractors (AGC) of America has released a study of highway work zone safety, and the results show that these job sites remain just as dangerous as ever. Most even say the danger is growing.


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Lowering Limits: Changes to Beryllium Exposure Requirements 


The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) recently issued a final rule modifying a 40-year-old standard pertaining to exposure to beryllium and beryllium compounds. It contains new requirements for general, construction and shipyard industries.


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ALI Sponsors National Ladder Safety Month With Industry Support

The first-ever National Ladder Safety Month, sponsored by the American Ladder Institute (ALI), is taking place this month. According to the ALI, the event is "the only movement dedicated exclusively to the promotion of ladder safety, at home and at work.


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Hidden In Plain Sight: Hazardous Energy in the Workplace


Electrical energy is the most common hazardous energy in the workplace. For electricians, linemen and wiremen, it likely is the most familiar. However, hazardous energy comes in many forms, including mechanical, chemical, nuclear, pneumatic, hydraulic and gravitational.


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