Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Prescription opioid abuse has been a major health problem in the United States for the last 25 years and is now in the news almost daily.

It finally happened. You have been asked to provide a short training program for your company’s staff. Whether it is about electrical safety, the latest National Electrical Code or any one of an infinite number of topics, training has become more important than ever.

Construction workers often use energy drinks, such as Monster and Red Bull, for a quick pick-me-up. However, many people are unaware of the risks their consumption poses. Using these highly caffeinated and nutritionally deficient beverages can result in serious health complications.

The U.S. Department of Labor and the Mine Safety and Health Administration have begun investigating situations where employees were sent to work alone.

More on Safety

 
OSHA Renews Partnership With Electrical Contractor Groups to Prevent Workplace Injuries and Fatalities
by Staff |

As part of continuing efforts to improve safety and health for electrical workers, the U.S.


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Making Sense of the Numbers

One of the first steps in performing an arc flash hazard calculation study is to request the short-circuit data from the electric utility company.


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NFPA 70E 2012 Marks Full Year of Improving Safety and Adding Value

As previously reported, the second annual NECA Safety Professionals Conference (NSPC) started with a big bang—a series of them, in fact. I am referring to the live arc flash demonstration at the Cooper Bussmann Paul P. Gubany Center for High Power Technology that opened the conference in St. Louis.


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Everyone on the Same Label

Since the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom 2012) passed into law in March, many have discussed the modifications and impact on workers worldwide. One of the areas of major change involves the labeling of hazardous chemicals used at the work site.


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Mark of Safety

From marking equipment and conductors at the factory to field-marking with signs where electrical hazards exist, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of marking requirements in the National Electrical Code (NEC).


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Some Catching Up To Do: OSHA Rule Overhaul

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is in the final stages of updating the existing standard on electric power generation transmission and distribution (1910.269 and Subpart V) related to electrical protective equipment.


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Watch Your Back

Ergonomics and work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are hot-button topics in workplace safety.


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