Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

More on Safety

 
Keeping Track

While Injury and illness records need only be posted in the workplace from Feb. 1 until April 30, the recordkeeping is ongoing. Not only must injuries and illnesses be logged again this year and compiled in 2014, other safety and health events and activities must be recorded and maintained.


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Arc Flash Studies

After having consultants crawl all over the place, asking questions and gathering mounds of data, the arc flash study for your facility is finally done.


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OSHA Warns of Carbon Monoxide Dangers in Cold Weather
by Staff |

cold winter weather serves as a reminder for employers to take necessary precautions to protect workers from the serious, and sometimes fatal, effects of carbon monoxide exposure, says the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).


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When No One Is Watching

Safety professionals often discuss the concept of a safety culture but, surprisingly, have been hard-pressed to offer a solid definition or prescription for achieving positive promotion of such a thing.


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A Dangerous Combination

in our industry, accidents often involve electricity. Beyond the risk of shock and electrocution, electricity generates extreme heat and arc flashes, which can cause fires.


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Is It Dead Yet?

“Kill the Circuit.” This phrase is a colorful way of saying de-energize the circuit. Easy enough­—just open a switch or other protective device and the circuit is “dead.” It should then be safe to work on, right? Wrong! Simply opening a switch does not guarantee the circuit is de-energized. Really?


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Look, Listen And Comprehend

Although the 2013 edition of the National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code contains 15 chapters and nine annexes, I find many contractors, designers and authorities having jurisdiction reference only one or two chapters when deciding what requirements will affect their fire alarm system design, install


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