Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Dickies Workwear Antrim Super Safety Boot has a steel toe cap and a midsole.

Electrocutions are consistently one of the leading causes of workplace fatalities and are a daily hazard for electricians and linemen. As such, various forms of personal protective equipment (PPE) can be worn to prevent direct contact with live wires or energized equipment.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 25 people are killed and many others are injured each year in accidents involving aerial lifts. This includes scissor lifts and boom-supported lifts, such as bucket trucks and cherry pickers.

On a daily basis, we hear sounds and noise in our environment from a variety of sources, such as television, radio, household appliances and traffic. However, these everyday sounds are usually at a safe volume.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is gearing up for some aggressive policy goals in the coming year. Its regulatory agenda furthers progress on a series of existing initiatives and some new areas of focus.

Electrical Contractor Magazine

More on Safety

 
Two Seconds?
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A lot can happen in two seconds. What may seem like the blink of an eye can feel like an eternity, especially during an arc flash. When calculating the incident energy as part of an arc flash study, sometimes the IEEE 1584 equations can produce unusually large values.

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Tie One On
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The personal fall arrest system (PFAS) is one of the most common types of fall protection used on job sites. PFAS refers to many different combinations of anchors, harnesses and connecting devices.

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Tools You Can't Touch
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Conducting a fire alarm system acceptance test in front of a fire official can prove daunting, even when the system passes muster. But doing any form of fire alarm system testing without having the proper tools is downright foolish.

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The Vapors
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Every work site has flammable and combustible liquids. A flammable liquid is much more volatile than a combustible one, meaning its vapors or fumes can ignite at temperatures below 100°F and some even lower than 32°F.

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Safety Training: Simple Answers to Basic Questions
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There seems to be no end to studies and theories on education and training that focus on methodology and effectiveness. Yet, for the lay person who simply wants the basic questions on safety training answered, they offer much more than is needed.

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Covering the Rest
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So far, this column has discussed changes to Chapters 1–17 and the new Chapter 24, Emergency Communications Systems, in the 2010 National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

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Calculations in a Flash
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One sentence in the IEEE 1584 Standard, IEEE Guide for Performing Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations, frequently has people scratching their heads: “Equipment below 240V need not be considered unless it involves at least one 125 kVA or larger low-impedance transformer in its immediate power supply.” Wha

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