Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In 2013, there were 796 on-the-job fatalities in the construction industry, 294 of which were caused by falls. Additionally, improper fall protection is one of the most cited violations on job sites by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 5 million U.S. workers are required to wear respirators. For linemen and wiremen, respirators protect against environments with insufficient oxygen levels, harmful airborne dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases, vapors and sprays.

An arc-flash study should not be thought of simply as an item that needs to be checked off the list. However, many people still view it this way.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 


More on Safety

 
A State of Shock
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Electrical safety is a topic worth discussing repeatedly. Both government and private organizations cover it. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed regulations addressing electrical hazards.

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Two Seconds?
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A lot can happen in two seconds. What may seem like the blink of an eye can feel like an eternity, especially during an arc flash. When calculating the incident energy as part of an arc flash study, sometimes the IEEE 1584 equations can produce unusually large values.

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Tie One On
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The personal fall arrest system (PFAS) is one of the most common types of fall protection used on job sites. PFAS refers to many different combinations of anchors, harnesses and connecting devices.

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Tools You Can't Touch
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Conducting a fire alarm system acceptance test in front of a fire official can prove daunting, even when the system passes muster. But doing any form of fire alarm system testing without having the proper tools is downright foolish.

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Covering the Rest
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So far, this column has discussed changes to Chapters 1–17 and the new Chapter 24, Emergency Communications Systems, in the 2010 National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

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The Vapors
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Every work site has flammable and combustible liquids. A flammable liquid is much more volatile than a combustible one, meaning its vapors or fumes can ignite at temperatures below 100°F and some even lower than 32°F.

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Safety Training: Simple Answers to Basic Questions
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There seems to be no end to studies and theories on education and training that focus on methodology and effectiveness. Yet, for the lay person who simply wants the basic questions on safety training answered, they offer much more than is needed.

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