Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 


As a contractor, you bid on numerous fire alarm system projects based on plans and specifications developed by an engineer. You assume the engineer has discussed such things as quality and reliability with the owner because the specifications focus on those issues.

Orientations, safety talks, task training, job briefings and safety meetings each require an interaction between the company and the employee.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 50 workers die annually in excavation and trenching accidents. Though most electricians are not directly involved in excavating operations, electrical workers may get involved when completing underground line work.

More on Safety

 
Tools You Can't Touch
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Conducting a fire alarm system acceptance test in front of a fire official can prove daunting, even when the system passes muster. But doing any form of fire alarm system testing without having the proper tools is downright foolish.

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The Vapors
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Every work site has flammable and combustible liquids. A flammable liquid is much more volatile than a combustible one, meaning its vapors or fumes can ignite at temperatures below 100°F and some even lower than 32°F.

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Safety Training: Simple Answers to Basic Questions
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There seems to be no end to studies and theories on education and training that focus on methodology and effectiveness. Yet, for the lay person who simply wants the basic questions on safety training answered, they offer much more than is needed.

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Covering the Rest
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So far, this column has discussed changes to Chapters 1–17 and the new Chapter 24, Emergency Communications Systems, in the 2010 National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

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Calculations in a Flash
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One sentence in the IEEE 1584 Standard, IEEE Guide for Performing Arc-Flash Hazard Calculations, frequently has people scratching their heads: “Equipment below 240V need not be considered unless it involves at least one 125 kVA or larger low-impedance transformer in its immediate power supply.” Wha

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Cleanup on Aisle 3
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For a long time, “going green” was used by hippies and tree-huggers. However, greening has become more mainstream and more necessary for businesses to remain competitive. Your business and the environment are more closely linked than you may think.

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Live Wire
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Too often, when it comes to electrical safety on the job site, it is assumed that the protection is only about electricians or those working around live wires.

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