Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

This article expands on “Control the Risk” (ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, March 2015). It addresses six key areas in the risk-control hierarchy and how each can be used to reduce the risk associated with the arc flash hazard.

More than a century ago, two giants in the fledgling electrical power industry battled it out for supremacy. The conflict, sometimes referred to as “The War of the Currents,” would define whether electric power systems would use alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC).

At many workplaces, driving is a part of everyday life. Unfortunately, more than 1,700 people are killed in occupation-related transportation accidents every year—roughly 40 percent of all on-the-job fatalities. However, safety precautions can be taken to help reduce the number of incidents.


One of the more popular American show-business legends is the one about P.T. Barnum and the egress. In 1841, Barnum launched his American Museum at the corner of Broadway and Ann Street in Lower Manhattan.

More on Safety

 
Chemistry Set
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It's obvious that work sites are dangerous places, but the present dangers may not be apparent.

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Zeroing in on Workplace Safety
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Risk is a part of life, but it’s more immediate and apparent in some lives—including those spent in the construction industry. Every construction project starts with some uncertainties. Will anything prevent us from accomplishing what we promised? Will we make a reasonable profit?

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One Size Does Not Fit All
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One of the first steps in performing an arc flash calculation study is to request short-circuit data from the electric utility company. This kind of request is pretty routine, and utilities have been providing this type of data for short-circuit studies for years.

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Creepy Crawlies
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As the weather warms up, workers face many potential hazards, not all of which are directly work/task-related. In addition to traditional safety concerns on the job site, nature throws in hazards that endanger our employees.

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Editors' Pick
Bottom Line: Safety
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Surviving any situation depends on knowing what to expect and being prepared to manage it. An Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection is no exception. Employers must know their rights and responsibilities.

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Rung By Rung
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Construction sites are complex. With every minute, the project inches toward completion, and the landscape changes. This is the reason why preplanning is instrumental in completing construction projects on schedule and accident-free.

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What OSHA Says
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that an employer furnish to each employee a place of employment that is free from recognized hazards that cause or have the potential to cause death or physical harm.

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