Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.

When All Electric Services Inc., 
Carbondale, Ill., won the electrical installation for a water park in its hometown, the company made safety the project’s focus.

Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

More on Safety

 
Some Catching Up To Do: OSHA Rule Overhaul

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is in the final stages of updating the existing standard on electric power generation transmission and distribution (1910.269 and Subpart V) related to electrical protective equipment.


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Dangers Lurk Under the Hood

One may encounter many different types of electric vehicles on a job site or at the workplace—e.g., forklifts, pallet trucks, golf carts and even Segways. They all run on batteries that must be periodically recharged, a process that has many safety considerations.


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It's a Gray Area

It happened once again! In one of my training programs, someone asked the all-too-familiar question, “What color should arc flash warning labels be?” It’s no wonder people are confused. This question could have more than one answer.


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Facelift

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) first issued its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) in 1983. It was designed to ensure employees receive information about the health and physical hazards of the chemicals in their workplace and about how to protect themselves.


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Rising to the Occasion: Wind and Solar Electrical Safety

A few months ago, I was driving home from the Los Angeles area and suddenly found myself surrounded by thousands of wind turbines lining both sides of Interstate 10. Even though I have made this trip many times, I am still in awe at the scale of it all.


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Studying for the Test

Sometimes I wonder if contractors read NFPA 72 2010, the National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, when they decide to begin installing a fire alarm system. Of course, it should not be considered optional.


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It Takes More Than Carrots

In the United States, more than 1 million people over the age of 40 are blind, and an additional 2.4 million are visually impaired to some degree. Many may take vision for granted, but it is vital to your livelihood.


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