Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

If you don’t agree that a fire alarm system is more than a fire alarm system, you should probably revisit Chapter 21, Emergency Control Function Interfaces, in NFPA 72 2016, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

Slips, trips and falls are leading causes of death in the workplace. In addition, they account for more than 1 million hospital visits nationwide each year, resulting in thousands of disabling injuries. Many of these incidents can be prevented by adhering to some basic safety protocols.

Collisions between workers and vehicles are some of the most expensive incidents on a work site. Beyond the most important form of defense—having diligent and well-trained workers on-site—some contractors use digital solutions to prevent collisions.

It might surprise most people to learn that 97 percent of all unintentional injury-related deaths—and 87 percent of all medically consulted unintentional injuries—actually occur off the job.


More on Safety

 
NEMA, UL Deliver Free Online Training Course for AFCIs

According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), an estimated 28,300 electrical residential building fires annually lead to 360 deaths and $995 million in direct property loss. Arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) can help curb these losses.


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Smithsonian Reaches Out for Help on Educational Electrical Video Production

With the impending generational shift of workers in the electrical industry, it is becoming more important to get young people interested in electricity to replace the retiring ranks.


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Injury and Illness Prevention Programs

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) prides itself in the fact that, since the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, job-related casualties and injuries have been reduced by more than 60 percent.


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Dangers Lurk Under the Hood

One may encounter many different types of electric vehicles on a job site or at the workplace—e.g., forklifts, pallet trucks, golf carts and even Segways. They all run on batteries that must be periodically recharged, a process that has many safety considerations.


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It's a Gray Area

It happened once again! In one of my training programs, someone asked the all-too-familiar question, “What color should arc flash warning labels be?” It’s no wonder people are confused. This question could have more than one answer.


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Facelift

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) first issued its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) in 1983. It was designed to ensure employees receive information about the health and physical hazards of the chemicals in their workplace and about how to protect themselves.


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Rising to the Occasion: Wind and Solar Electrical Safety

A few months ago, I was driving home from the Los Angeles area and suddenly found myself surrounded by thousands of wind turbines lining both sides of Interstate 10. Even though I have made this trip many times, I am still in awe at the scale of it all.


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