Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Nearly 30 million U.S. workers are exposed to hazardous noise every year. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that more than 125,000 workers have suffered significant or permanent hearing loss since 2004.

Fatal Four


You are probably thinking this is yet another lecture about electrical safety. While focusing each May on safety is important, we should care about it every day. Unfortunately, preventable injuries and fatalities often occur when people fail to practice electrical safety.


After years of success in improving lineworker safety, the electrical industry’s work isn’t finished yet. In the past decade, the job of lineworkers—still considered the industry’s riskiest work—has become dramatically safer.

How many times has an owner or a customer asked your company to work on energized equipment? How many times has an electrician chosen to not turn off a circuit because it was inconvenient?

More on Safety

 
Doing the Heavy Lifting
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On Aug. 9, 2010, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued the long-awaited Crane and Derricks in Construction Final Rule.

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A State of Shock
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Electrical safety is a topic worth discussing repeatedly. Both government and private organizations cover it. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has developed regulations addressing electrical hazards.

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Two Seconds?
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A lot can happen in two seconds. What may seem like the blink of an eye can feel like an eternity, especially during an arc flash. When calculating the incident energy as part of an arc flash study, sometimes the IEEE 1584 equations can produce unusually large values.

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Tie One On
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The personal fall arrest system (PFAS) is one of the most common types of fall protection used on job sites. PFAS refers to many different combinations of anchors, harnesses and connecting devices.

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Tools You Can't Touch
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Conducting a fire alarm system acceptance test in front of a fire official can prove daunting, even when the system passes muster. But doing any form of fire alarm system testing without having the proper tools is downright foolish.

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The Vapors
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Every work site has flammable and combustible liquids. A flammable liquid is much more volatile than a combustible one, meaning its vapors or fumes can ignite at temperatures below 100°F and some even lower than 32°F.

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Safety Training: Simple Answers to Basic Questions
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There seems to be no end to studies and theories on education and training that focus on methodology and effectiveness. Yet, for the lay person who simply wants the basic questions on safety training answered, they offer much more than is needed.

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