Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Around 2,500 years ago, the Greek philosopher Heraclitus is credited with the saying, “The only thing that is constant is change.” Who knew this ancient proverb would apply to NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace?

Sanford Heart Hospital

Electrical contractors working in healthcare facilities must adhere to rigorous safety protocols, the National Electrical Code and cleanliness standards often tougher than those imposed in other types of projects.

The term “safe” is defined as a state that is secure from the liability to harm, injury, danger or risk. The basic condition of being safe involves actions taken to remain protected or guarded from danger and to reduce risks to the lowest possible level.

The JATC of Greater Boston’s training room is stocked with essential PPE.

The Electrical trade is one of the most dangerous to work in. Electricians face the usual hazards found on most job sites, and the additional risk of electrical shock can cause serious injuries and death.


More on Safety

 
Arc Flash Studies And GIGO

Mistakes happen, and there are plenty of opportunities to make them when performing an arc flash calculation study. The good news is commercially available arc flash software can help simplify the study process and perhaps even reduce errors.


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Follow The Directions

Even the most basic projects can turn deadly when hazards are not assessed and safety rules are not followed (regardless of the worker’s experience).


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Heads Up On HazCom Changes

In May 2012, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enacted changes to the Hazard Communication (HazCom) Standard. The goal is to align HazCom with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).


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In the third test, the cover blew open.
Arc Flash Studies And Murphy's Law

Edward Murphy is famous for his law that states: “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.” When performing an arc flash study, Murphy’s Law becomes very important if assumptions are made about this rare but potentially deadly event. 



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Our Worst Fears

In June 2008, a four-person crew began work to upgrade existing 7,200-volt (V) power lines by installing new 15-kilovolt (kV) switches and removing the old switches. The crew was divided into two-person teams.


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Stating The Obvious

Your employees work with an abundance of hand and power tools. You can help keep them safe by ensuring they are well-versed in common-sense tool safety. Although we all should know the following 10 safety tips, a review never hurts.


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How Much Effort?

The first step in conducting an arc flash study is to obtain the data necessary to accurately represent the electrical system. Equations defined by IEEE 1584–IEEE Guide for Performing Arc Flash Hazard Calculations are at the heart of most studies and require a lot of data.



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