Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In 2013, there were 796 on-the-job fatalities in the construction industry, 294 of which were caused by falls. Additionally, improper fall protection is one of the most cited violations on job sites by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 5 million U.S. workers are required to wear respirators. For linemen and wiremen, respirators protect against environments with insufficient oxygen levels, harmful airborne dusts, fogs, smokes, mists, gases, vapors and sprays.

An arc-flash study should not be thought of simply as an item that needs to be checked off the list. However, many people still view it this way.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 1.6 million U.S. workers enter confined spaces every year. Unfortunately, nearly 100 workers are killed, and more than 5,000 other accidents occur annually in such environments. 


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Chemistry Set
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It's obvious that work sites are dangerous places, but the present dangers may not be apparent.

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Zeroing in on Workplace Safety
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Risk is a part of life, but it’s more immediate and apparent in some lives—including those spent in the construction industry. Every construction project starts with some uncertainties. Will anything prevent us from accomplishing what we promised? Will we make a reasonable profit?

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One Size Does Not Fit All
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One of the first steps in performing an arc flash calculation study is to request short-circuit data from the electric utility company. This kind of request is pretty routine, and utilities have been providing this type of data for short-circuit studies for years.

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Creepy Crawlies
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As the weather warms up, workers face many potential hazards, not all of which are directly work/task-related. In addition to traditional safety concerns on the job site, nature throws in hazards that endanger our employees.

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What OSHA Says
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires that an employer furnish to each employee a place of employment that is free from recognized hazards that cause or have the potential to cause death or physical harm.

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Confusion About Arc Flash Warning Labels
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You look at the arc flash warning label and scratch your head. “Danger! No PPE Category Found.” No personal protective equipment (PPE) category? Now what?

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