Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

More on Safety

 
Will The Owner Know?

As a contractor, you bid on numerous fire alarm system projects based on plans and specifications developed by an engineer. You assume the engineer has discussed such things as quality and reliability with the owner because the specifications focus on those issues.


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Orientations, Task Training and Safety Meetings

Orientations, safety talks, task training, job briefings and safety meetings each require an interaction between the company and the employee.


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Excavating And Trenching

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 50 workers die annually in excavation and trenching accidents. Though most electricians are not directly involved in excavating operations, electrical workers may get involved when completing underground line work.


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Competence And Communication

Recently, I read an article in American School and University magazine by Tom Tapper that discusses competence and communication. Although his article focuses on education, it caused me to consider what the words “competence” and “communication” mean in our fire alarm systems profession. 



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Arc rating only

Label Enabled

“What do you mean we need to relabel the electrical equipment? Didn’t we just do this a few years ago?”



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How Engaged Is Your 'Management' With 'Safety on The Job'?

We have heard from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the industry that, for a safety program to be effective, management must be involved. What does that mean? Do they only fund the program? Does management hire just one person to oversee safety?


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Stay Ahead Of The Spark

The leading cause of residential fires in the United States each year—and the second leading cause of nonresidential fires—is electrical failure and malfunction.


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