Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Once a bedroom-only requirement, arc-fault 
circuit interrupters (AFCIs)­—either as breakers or receptacles—today are required in almost all areas of the home.

Addressable fire alarm systems are the typical choice for new installations. The programmability gives designers and installers an astounding array of operational features. However, occupants may not understand their responsibilities or how to interpret an alarm. 


This article is the third in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. Parts 1 and 2 appeared in the January and March 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, respectively.

While National Electrical Safety Month was created and is also primarily managed by the Electrical Safety Foundation International (ESFI), a number of other entities engage in activities and promote in other ways.

More on Safety

 
Watch Where You're Going!

We’re all aware of distracted driving and the dangers it can create for everyone on the road. What about distracted walking? During spring 2012, a popular online video featured a woman walking through a mall while texting. It’s nothing noteworthy until she falls into the mall’s fountain.


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A Good Host

Large corporations and general contractors have evaluated the safety programs and performance of subcontractors—including electrical contractors—for years. Now, the number of companies evaluating contractors seems to be growing.


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One Rung at a Time

Recently, OSHA released some startling statistics: it only takes one second to hit the ground from a height of 16 feet, and more than half of the fatal falls in construction are from heights of less than 25 feet. So a fall can happen in a blink of an eye and can be serious.


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OSHA Renews Partnership With Electrical Contractor Groups to Prevent Workplace Injuries and Fatalities
by Staff |

As part of continuing efforts to improve safety and health for electrical workers, the U.S.


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Making Sense of the Numbers

One of the first steps in performing an arc flash hazard calculation study is to request the short-circuit data from the electric utility company.


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Everyone on the Same Label

Since the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom 2012) passed into law in March, many have discussed the modifications and impact on workers worldwide. One of the areas of major change involves the labeling of hazardous chemicals used at the work site.


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Mark of Safety

From marking equipment and conductors at the factory to field-marking with signs where electrical hazards exist, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of marking requirements in the National Electrical Code (NEC).


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