Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The likelihood of getting inspected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is pretty low. In fact, each year, state and federal agencies conduct roughly only 100,000 job site inspections.

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has had general industry and shipyard standards regulating work in confined spaces for years. Those regulations require employers to determine which safety measures and procedures must be established for work to occur.

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.

As the dangers of arc flash have become better known, the market for arc-rated (AR) clothing has grown. Unlike earlier offerings, many of today’s garments can be comfortable to wear on a daily basis.

More on Safety

 
A Good Host

Large corporations and general contractors have evaluated the safety programs and performance of subcontractors—including electrical contractors—for years. Now, the number of companies evaluating contractors seems to be growing.


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One Rung at a Time

Recently, OSHA released some startling statistics: it only takes one second to hit the ground from a height of 16 feet, and more than half of the fatal falls in construction are from heights of less than 25 feet. So a fall can happen in a blink of an eye and can be serious.


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OSHA Renews Partnership With Electrical Contractor Groups to Prevent Workplace Injuries and Fatalities
by Staff |

As part of continuing efforts to improve safety and health for electrical workers, the U.S.


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Making Sense of the Numbers

One of the first steps in performing an arc flash hazard calculation study is to request the short-circuit data from the electric utility company.


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Everyone on the Same Label

Since the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom 2012) passed into law in March, many have discussed the modifications and impact on workers worldwide. One of the areas of major change involves the labeling of hazardous chemicals used at the work site.


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Mark of Safety

From marking equipment and conductors at the factory to field-marking with signs where electrical hazards exist, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of marking requirements in the National Electrical Code (NEC).


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NFPA 70E 2012 Marks Full Year of Improving Safety and Adding Value

As previously reported, the second annual NECA Safety Professionals Conference (NSPC) started with a big bang—a series of them, in fact. I am referring to the live arc flash demonstration at the Cooper Bussmann Paul P. Gubany Center for High Power Technology that opened the conference in St. Louis.


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