Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

In recent years, the number of counterfeit consumer safety products and electronic components has grown exponentially in the United States. The problem has become so widespread that counterfeit airplane parts were even found in Air Force One.

The new year may not be here just yet, but the 2017 National Electrical Code (NEC) is! And with it comes new requirements to help protect workers from arc-flash hazards.


On November 17, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule updating Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment (Fall Protection Systems) standards in general industries such as building management services, utilities, warehousing, retail, windo

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on www.ecmag.com.


More on Safety

 
OSHA Outlook 2014

The current economic climate in Washington, D.C., is uncertain at best. Last minute approval of the federal budget in late December would seem to offer a little more insight into how the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) will operate in 2014.


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Breathe Easy

In August, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) that included modifications to a 40-year-old-plus standard that addresses respirable crystalline silica exposure limits and other silica-related hazards.


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Don't Blow It
by Staff |

On the job, many electricians, linemen, wiremen and other construction-related workers will encounter or use a pneumatic-powered tool at some point. Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air or compressed carbon dioxide (CO2) supplied by a small cylinder.


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Arc Flash Studies And GIGO

Mistakes happen, and there are plenty of opportunities to make them when performing an arc flash calculation study. The good news is commercially available arc flash software can help simplify the study process and perhaps even reduce errors.


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Follow The Directions

Even the most basic projects can turn deadly when hazards are not assessed and safety rules are not followed (regardless of the worker’s experience).


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Heads Up On HazCom Changes

In May 2012, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enacted changes to the Hazard Communication (HazCom) Standard. The goal is to align HazCom with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).


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In the third test, the cover blew open.
Arc Flash Studies And Murphy's Law

Edward Murphy is famous for his law that states: “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.” When performing an arc flash study, Murphy’s Law becomes very important if assumptions are made about this rare but potentially deadly event. 



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