Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.

When All Electric Services Inc., 
Carbondale, Ill., won the electrical installation for a water park in its hometown, the company made safety the project’s focus.

Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

Arc flash boundary


This is the fourth article in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc-flash hazard calculations. The first three parts appeared in the January, March and May 2016 issues of Electrical Contractor and can be found at www.ecmag.com.
 Arc flash boundary


More on Safety

 
Our Worst Fears

In June 2008, a four-person crew began work to upgrade existing 7,200-volt (V) power lines by installing new 15-kilovolt (kV) switches and removing the old switches. The crew was divided into two-person teams.


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Stating The Obvious

Your employees work with an abundance of hand and power tools. You can help keep them safe by ensuring they are well-versed in common-sense tool safety. Although we all should know the following 10 safety tips, a review never hurts.


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How Much Effort?

The first step in conducting an arc flash study is to obtain the data necessary to accurately represent the electrical system. Equations defined by IEEE 1584–IEEE Guide for Performing Arc Flash Hazard Calculations are at the heart of most studies and require a lot of data.



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Defying Gravity

Falls are still the top cause of serious injuries and deaths for Americans at work. According to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), there were 264 fall fatalities (255 of which were falls to lower levels) in the construction trades in 2010.


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Simple Ergonomics: WMSDs

The risk factors for developing a work-related musculoskeletal disorder (WMSD) involve typical body movements used over the course of the workday.


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Tool User Beware

Construction workers face numerous and varied job-site dangers, depending on the type of work they do. In addition to risks common to most construction jobs, electricians face the hazard of electric shock and other dangers associated with live power.



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Editors' Pick
Learn Not To Burn

Without warning, smoke rolled out from under the tires as they squealed against the pavement with the brakes locked up. The big truck seemed to come from nowhere. It felt like an eternity; although it was really only a matter of seconds, then … CRASH!


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