Electrical Contractor Magazine

Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

System upgrades, short-circuit current


It goes up. It goes down. Sometimes, it is thought to be infinite (although it isn’t), and other times, it seems impossible to find. The available short-circuit current from the electric utility is one of the more important pieces of information for an arc flash hazard calculation study.

In recent years, thousands of occupational fatalities and injuries have occurred as a result of electrical contact. Many of these accidents happen when workers do not use the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) for the job or they use it improperly.

Fires and explosions in the workplace result in nearly 200 fatalities and injure some 5,000 workers every year. The resulting costs of such incidents reach more than $2 billion annually.

Slips, trips and falls are the second leading cause of death in the workplace and account for more than 1 million hospital visits in the United States each year. During the winter months, hazardous weather conditions greatly increase the risk for such incidents.

Electrical Contractor Magazine

More on Safety

 
Chemistry Set
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It's obvious that work sites are dangerous places, but the present dangers may not be apparent.

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Zeroing in on Workplace Safety
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Risk is a part of life, but it’s more immediate and apparent in some lives—including those spent in the construction industry. Every construction project starts with some uncertainties. Will anything prevent us from accomplishing what we promised? Will we make a reasonable profit?

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One Size Does Not Fit All
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One of the first steps in performing an arc flash calculation study is to request short-circuit data from the electric utility company. This kind of request is pretty routine, and utilities have been providing this type of data for short-circuit studies for years.

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Creepy Crawlies
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As the weather warms up, workers face many potential hazards, not all of which are directly work/task-related. In addition to traditional safety concerns on the job site, nature throws in hazards that endanger our employees.

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Editors' Pick
Fukushima: Re-energizing Nuclear-Safety Concerns
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As the aftermath of Japan’s March 11 earthquake and tsunami unfolded, many became mesmerized by photos and videos of desperate workers struggling against time to keep the disastrous situation at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant from becoming even worse.

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Side By Side: Equipment Grounding Conductors
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Many electrical designs incorporate parallel arrangements. The National Electrical Code (NEC) requires parallel conductors when supplying large switchboards and other large electrical equipment because large single conductors are not practical, economical or even available in many cases.

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Editors' Pick
Bottom Line: Safety
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Surviving any situation depends on knowing what to expect and being prepared to manage it. An Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspection is no exception. Employers must know their rights and responsibilities.

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