Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The dog days of summer are upon us. It is vacation season, and employees are likely to spend more time outdoors on home-improvement projects and other leisure activities. With so much emphasis on job safety, it’s easy to forget that most injuries and illnesses actually happen away from work.

I’ve heard it all before. “What were they thinking when they wrote this standard? If I were them, this is how I would have done it.” When it comes to arc flash and electrical safety standards, complaints, armchair quarterbacking and second-guessing follow as soon as the latest edition comes out.

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.

At many workplaces, driving is a part of everyday life. Unfortunately, more than 1,700 people are killed in occupation-related transportation accidents every year—roughly 40 percent of all on-the-job fatalities. However, safety precautions can be taken to help reduce the number of incidents.


More on Safety

 
Some Catching Up To Do: OSHA Rule Overhaul
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is in the final stages of updating the existing standard on electric power generation transmission and distribution (1910.269 and Subpart V) related to electrical protective equipment.

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Watch Your Back
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Ergonomics and work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are hot-button topics in workplace safety.

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Report Reveals Costs of Construction Accidents in Maryland
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All business owners know there are costs associated with accidents and injuries.

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NEMA, UL Deliver Free Online Training Course for AFCIs
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According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), an estimated 28,300 electrical residential building fires annually lead to 360 deaths and $995 million in direct property loss. Arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) can help curb these losses.

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Dangers Lurk Under the Hood
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One may encounter many different types of electric vehicles on a job site or at the workplace—e.g., forklifts, pallet trucks, golf carts and even Segways. They all run on batteries that must be periodically recharged, a process that has many safety considerations.

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It's a Gray Area
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It happened once again! In one of my training programs, someone asked the all-too-familiar question, “What color should arc flash warning labels be?” It’s no wonder people are confused. This question could have more than one answer.

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Facelift
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) first issued its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) in 1983. It was designed to ensure employees receive information about the health and physical hazards of the chemicals in their workplace and about how to protect themselves.

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