Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Major storms this hurricane season wreaked havoc on the southeastern United States, including Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. These storms created weather hazards as well as dangerous conditions for power utilities and restoration efforts.

For each project, electrical contractors must ensure the right equipment is on-site, that it’s affordable and, most important, safe and reliable. But what to do when dealing with installed equipment or with tools and equipment that they don’t own? How do they know it’s safe and hasn’t been damaged?

Life is full of surprises, and so is the 2018 edition of NFPA 70E. After years of requiring specific information on arc flash equipment labels, as listed in 130.5(H1) through (H3), the 2018 edition has introduced Exception No.

This December 1 is the deadline set by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that requires medium to large contractors in certain industries, to provide injury, illness, and incident information using the new Injury Tracking Application (ITA).

More on Safety

 
Get Out In Front Of Trouble

Conducting preventative maintenance on a car is much more effective and less costly than making repairs after it breaks down. The same goes for occupational safety. Unfortunately, for many years, employers have used lagging indicators as their safety strategy.


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Every Line Of Defense

This article expands on “Control the Risk” (ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, March 2015). It addresses six key areas in the risk-control hierarchy and how each can be used to reduce the risk associated with the arc flash hazard.


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Know Your Arc: DC arc flash calculations

More than a century ago, two giants in the fledgling electrical power industry battled it out for supremacy. The conflict, sometimes referred to as “The War of the Currents,” would define whether electric power systems would use alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC).


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Dickies Workwear Antrim Super Safety Boot has a steel toe cap and a midsole.
Feet On The Ground

Electrocutions are consistently one of the leading causes of workplace fatalities and are a daily hazard for electricians and linemen. As such, various forms of personal protective equipment (PPE) can be worn to prevent direct contact with live wires or energized equipment.


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CGA Promotes Shared Responsibility During National Safe Digging Month

Not everyone knows it, but April is National Safe Digging Month, an event sponsored by the Common Ground Alliance, a 1,700-member organization formed in 2000 to bring together stakeholders involved in the underground utility industry (electric, gas, cable, etc.).


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You Lift Me Up

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than 25 people are killed and many others are injured each year in accidents involving aerial lifts. This includes scissor lifts and boom-supported lifts, such as bucket trucks and cherry pickers.


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The Challenges Ahead: OSHA Outlook

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is gearing up for some aggressive policy goals in the coming year. Its regulatory agenda furthers progress on a series of existing initiatives and some new areas of focus.


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