Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Arc flash boundary


This is the fourth article in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc-flash hazard calculations. The first three parts appeared in the January, March and May 2016 issues of Electrical Contractor and can be found at www.ecmag.com.
 Arc flash boundary


Thunderstorms


Every year, preventable, weather-related injuries and deaths occur both on and off the job. With the summer storm season in full swing, employers and employees must educate themselves about the dangers associated with thunderstorms, tornadoes and hurricanes.

If you don’t agree that a fire alarm system is more than a fire alarm system, you should probably revisit Chapter 21, Emergency Control Function Interfaces, in NFPA 72 2016, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code.

Slips, trips and falls are leading causes of death in the workplace. In addition, they account for more than 1 million hospital visits nationwide each year, resulting in thousands of disabling injuries. Many of these incidents can be prevented by adhering to some basic safety protocols.

More on Safety

 
Don't Blow It
by Staff |

On the job, many electricians, linemen, wiremen and other construction-related workers will encounter or use a pneumatic-powered tool at some point. Pneumatic tools are powered by compressed air or compressed carbon dioxide (CO2) supplied by a small cylinder.


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Arc Flash Studies And GIGO

Mistakes happen, and there are plenty of opportunities to make them when performing an arc flash calculation study. The good news is commercially available arc flash software can help simplify the study process and perhaps even reduce errors.


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Follow The Directions

Even the most basic projects can turn deadly when hazards are not assessed and safety rules are not followed (regardless of the worker’s experience).


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Heads Up On HazCom Changes

In May 2012, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) enacted changes to the Hazard Communication (HazCom) Standard. The goal is to align HazCom with the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals (GHS).


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In the third test, the cover blew open.
Arc Flash Studies And Murphy's Law

Edward Murphy is famous for his law that states: “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.” When performing an arc flash study, Murphy’s Law becomes very important if assumptions are made about this rare but potentially deadly event. 



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Our Worst Fears

In June 2008, a four-person crew began work to upgrade existing 7,200-volt (V) power lines by installing new 15-kilovolt (kV) switches and removing the old switches. The crew was divided into two-person teams.


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Stating The Obvious

Your employees work with an abundance of hand and power tools. You can help keep them safe by ensuring they are well-versed in common-sense tool safety. Although we all should know the following 10 safety tips, a review never hurts.


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