Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

One of the more popular American show-business legends is the one about P.T. Barnum and the egress. In 1841, Barnum launched his American Museum at the corner of Broadway and Ann Street in Lower Manhattan.

Recently, a fire occurred in an 11-story apartment that primarily housed elderly people, although it was not labeled as a senior living building. Six people died and multiple people were injured as a result of the fire.

“You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” That famous song lyric can be appropriately applied to the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E. What is gone? Zero is no longer one of the hazard/risk categories (HRCs).

Conducting preventative maintenance on a car is much more effective and less costly than making repairs after it breaks down. The same goes for occupational safety. Unfortunately, for many years, employers have used lagging indicators as their safety strategy.

Electrical Contractor Magazine

More on Safety

 
Mark of Safety
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From marking equipment and conductors at the factory to field-marking with signs where electrical hazards exist, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of marking requirements in the National Electrical Code (NEC).

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Some Catching Up To Do: OSHA Rule Overhaul
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is in the final stages of updating the existing standard on electric power generation transmission and distribution (1910.269 and Subpart V) related to electrical protective equipment.

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Watch Your Back
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Ergonomics and work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSDs) are hot-button topics in workplace safety.

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Report Reveals Costs of Construction Accidents in Maryland
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All business owners know there are costs associated with accidents and injuries.

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NEMA, UL Deliver Free Online Training Course for AFCIs
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According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), an estimated 28,300 electrical residential building fires annually lead to 360 deaths and $995 million in direct property loss. Arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) can help curb these losses.

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Smithsonian Reaches Out for Help on Educational Electrical Video Production
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With the impending generational shift of workers in the electrical industry, it is becoming more important to get young people interested in electricity to replace the retiring ranks.

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Injury and Illness Prevention Programs
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The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) prides itself in the fact that, since the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, job-related casualties and injuries have been reduced by more than 60 percent.

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