Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

The dog days of summer are upon us. It is vacation season, and employees are likely to spend more time outdoors on home-improvement projects and other leisure activities. With so much emphasis on job safety, it’s easy to forget that most injuries and illnesses actually happen away from work.

I’ve heard it all before. “What were they thinking when they wrote this standard? If I were them, this is how I would have done it.” When it comes to arc flash and electrical safety standards, complaints, armchair quarterbacking and second-guessing follow as soon as the latest edition comes out.

Powered industrial trucks cause approximately 100 fatalities and more than 35,000 serious injuries every year. It is estimated that as many as 25 percent of all accidents involving this type of equipment can be attributed to lack of training.

More on Safety

 
OSHA Renews Partnership With Electrical Contractor Groups to Prevent Workplace Injuries and Fatalities
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As part of continuing efforts to improve safety and health for electrical workers, the U.S.

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Making Sense of the Numbers
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One of the first steps in performing an arc flash hazard calculation study is to request the short-circuit data from the electric utility company.

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Everyone on the Same Label
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Since the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom 2012) passed into law in March, many have discussed the modifications and impact on workers worldwide. One of the areas of major change involves the labeling of hazardous chemicals used at the work site.

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Mark of Safety
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From marking equipment and conductors at the factory to field-marking with signs where electrical hazards exist, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of marking requirements in the National Electrical Code (NEC).

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NFPA 70E 2012 Marks Full Year of Improving Safety and Adding Value
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As previously reported, the second annual NECA Safety Professionals Conference (NSPC) started with a big bang—a series of them, in fact. I am referring to the live arc flash demonstration at the Cooper Bussmann Paul P. Gubany Center for High Power Technology that opened the conference in St. Louis.

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NEMA, UL Deliver Free Online Training Course for AFCIs
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According to the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), an estimated 28,300 electrical residential building fires annually lead to 360 deaths and $995 million in direct property loss. Arc-fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) can help curb these losses.

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Smithsonian Reaches Out for Help on Educational Electrical Video Production
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With the impending generational shift of workers in the electrical industry, it is becoming more important to get young people interested in electricity to replace the retiring ranks.

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