Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The first thing that comes to mind when thinking of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is government regulation compliance.

“Properly” and “Maintained”—these two words always come up when discussing arc flash hazards. Why? Because protective devices such as circuit breakers and relays that have not been properly maintained may not operate as quickly as they should.

There are many frequently asked questions about performing an arc-flash study (risk assessment) and understanding electrical safety requirements. A careful read of standards such as NPFA 70E or IEEE 1584 can answer some questions. Yet, other questions can be more complex.

Contact with electrical current is one of the leading causes of occupational injuries and fatalities. Due to the nature of their jobs, wire and line workers carry an exponential risk for being involved in these types of incidents.

More on Safety

Watch Where You're Going!

We’re all aware of distracted driving and the dangers it can create for everyone on the road. What about distracted walking? During spring 2012, a popular online video featured a woman walking through a mall while texting. It’s nothing noteworthy until she falls into the mall’s fountain.

A Good Host

Large corporations and general contractors have evaluated the safety programs and performance of subcontractors—including electrical contractors—for years. Now, the number of companies evaluating contractors seems to be growing.

One Rung at a Time

Recently, OSHA released some startling statistics: it only takes one second to hit the ground from a height of 16 feet, and more than half of the fatal falls in construction are from heights of less than 25 feet. So a fall can happen in a blink of an eye and can be serious.

OSHA Renews Partnership With Electrical Contractor Groups to Prevent Workplace Injuries and Fatalities
by Staff |

As part of continuing efforts to improve safety and health for electrical workers, the U.S.

Making Sense of the Numbers

One of the first steps in performing an arc flash hazard calculation study is to request the short-circuit data from the electric utility company.

Everyone on the Same Label

Since the revised Hazard Communication Standard (HCS, or HazCom 2012) passed into law in March, many have discussed the modifications and impact on workers worldwide. One of the areas of major change involves the labeling of hazardous chemicals used at the work site.

Mark of Safety

From marking equipment and conductors at the factory to field-marking with signs where electrical hazards exist, there are hundreds, if not thousands, of marking requirements in the National Electrical Code (NEC).