Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

“Don’t touch that dial” is an old phrase from the 1960s television era that an announcer would say just before “Batman” or another program cut to a commercial. They would pronounce it so authoritatively that you wouldn’t dare change the channel.

As the dangers of arc flash have become better known, the market for arc-rated (AR) clothing has grown. Unlike earlier offerings, many of today’s garments can be comfortable to wear on a daily basis.

With winter rapidly approaching, it is important to protect workers from the coming cold temperatures and potential extreme weather. Prolonged exposure to these conditions can result in serious health problems, including trench foot, hypothermia and frostbite.

In all likelihood, you will never be involved in a scenario involving an intruder or active shooter in the workplace. But in the event you find yourself in this situation, this article provides basic background and awareness information on how to respond.

More on Safety

Know Your Arc: DC arc flash calculations

More than a century ago, two giants in the fledgling electrical power industry battled it out for supremacy. The conflict, sometimes referred to as “The War of the Currents,” would define whether electric power systems would use alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC).

Buckle Up

At many workplaces, driving is a part of everyday life. Unfortunately, more than 1,700 people are killed in occupation-related transportation accidents every year—roughly 40 percent of all on-the-job fatalities. However, safety precautions can be taken to help reduce the number of incidents.

In Case Of Fire: Which Way to Egress?

One of the more popular American show-business legends is the one about P.T. Barnum and the egress. In 1841, Barnum launched his American Museum at the corner of Broadway and Ann Street in Lower Manhattan.

Alarms Can Cry Wolf

Recently, a fire occurred in an 11-story apartment that primarily housed elderly people, although it was not labeled as a senior living building. Six people died and multiple people were injured as a result of the fire.

Less Than Zero

“You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone.” That famous song lyric can be appropriately applied to the 2015 edition of NFPA 70E. What is gone? Zero is no longer one of the hazard/risk categories (HRCs).

Get Out In Front Of Trouble

Conducting preventative maintenance on a car is much more effective and less costly than making repairs after it breaks down. The same goes for occupational safety. Unfortunately, for many years, employers have used lagging indicators as their safety strategy.

Every Line Of Defense

This article expands on “Control the Risk” (ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR, March 2015). It addresses six key areas in the risk-control hierarchy and how each can be used to reduce the risk associated with the arc flash hazard.