Safety

 

 

Electrical construction is dangerous work. Electrical contractors and workers must always adhere to safety best practices. Just what are those practices? The following articles, listed chronologically by date, document safety measures and practices that help ensure everyone gets home safely at the end of the work day. 

The first-ever National Ladder Safety Month, sponsored by the American Ladder Institute (ALI), is taking place this month. According to the ALI, the event is "the only movement dedicated exclusively to the promotion of ladder safety, at home and at work.

Electrical energy is the most common hazardous energy in the workplace. For electricians, linemen and wiremen, it likely is the most familiar. However, hazardous energy comes in many forms, including mechanical, chemical, nuclear, pneumatic, hydraulic and gravitational.

It’s the same old story. An arc flash study was just completed, and the calculated incident energy exceeds 40 calories per square centimeter (cal/cm2) in many locations. When this happens, people often just shake their head and ask, “Now what do we do?”


by
Staff  

Since their inclusion in the National Electrical Code (NEC), arc fault circuit interrupters (AFCIs) have brought greater protection to homes, many of which are increasingly overwhelmed by the growing electrical demands of our high-tech and appliance-rich lifestyles.

More on Safety

 
OSHA Brings General Industries' Standards on Slip, Trip and Fall Hazards Up to Speed with Construction Standards

On November 17, 2016, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a final rule updating Walking-Working Surfaces and Personal Protective Equipment (Fall Protection Systems) standards in general industries such as building management services, utilities, warehousing, retail, windo


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Easy On The Eyes: Eye Protection

Every day, More than 2,000 people incur job-related eye injuries that require medical treatment. It is estimated that proper eye and face protection can prevent 90 percent of these injuries.


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Beyond Labels And PPE

This article is the fifth and final part in a series that provides a step-by-step approach for performing arc flash hazard calculations. The previous parts appeared in the January, March, May and July 2016 issues of ELECTRICAL ­CONTRACTOR and are on www.ecmag.com.



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OSHA Updates Guidelines for Health and Safety Programs

In October, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) released an updated set of Recommended Practices for Safety and Health programs, bringing the original guidelines from 1989 into the 21st century.


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Emphasizing Compliance

For this month’s safety column, I interviewed John Garbarino, director of marketing for Leviton’s commercial and industrial business division.


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Shock Free! All Electric Services Inc. Constructs Electrical System for Super Splash Park

When All Electric Services Inc., 
Carbondale, Ill., won the electrical installation for a water park in its hometown, the company made safety the project’s focus.


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The Sky Isn't Falling: Avoiding Accidents Involving Falling Objects

Falling objects such as tools, people and other materials are major work site hazards throughout the United States. In fact, the Bureau of Labor Statistics estimates this hazard causes more than 50,000 injuries and 200 deaths each year.


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