A decision by Harvard University to install new, high-efficiency cooling equipment qualifies the university for a $250,000 rebate from NSTAR, a Massachusetts electric and gas utility; it will dramatically impact the university’s future energy use. The new equipment, funded in part through NSTAR’s Construction Solutions energy-efficiency program, is expected to save more than 2 million -kilowatt-hours of electricity per year when compared to standard-efficiency models. The move also will result in -Harvard saving approximately $150,000 each year in operating costs.

“Harvard University is a large customer with substantial energy needs,” said Penni McLean-Conner, NSTAR’s vice president of customer care. “By opting to install a high-efficiency cooling system in its new facility, the university not only receives a significant rebate from NSTAR, but will also enjoy the energy-saving benefits for years to come.”

“The construction of our new Northwest Plant is a prime example of how Harvard engages in responsible expansion,” said Tom Vautin, Harvard’s associate vice president for facilities and environmental services. “The campus is growing, but the new facility adds capacity while saving money and reducing Harvard’s environmental footprint.”

Working with NSTAR’s energy- efficiency team and the company’s Construction Solutions program, Harvard installed a high-efficiency chilled water plant adjacent to the university’s new Northwest Science building. The new plant is the latest addition to Harvard’s district cooling system that serves 73 campus buildings. Construction Solutions promotes the use of high-efficiency equipment instead of standard--efficiency models by rebating up to 75 percent of the incremental cost difference between the two options.