Codes & Standards

 

Essential to the work of the electrical contractor is knowledge of the National Electrical Code, the National Electrical Installation Standards and additional standards and codes administered by the National Fire Protection Association, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and others. Here is a list of all our articles on codes and standards listed chronologically by issue date. 

What is a knife switch?


Jim Dollard has an extensive background in codes and standards. If you have a query about the National Electrical Code (NEC), Jim will help you solve it. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@gmail.com. Answers are based on the 2014 NEC.
 What is a knife switch?


The National Electrical Code (NEC) has contained multiwire branch-­circuit color coding since the early 1950s. However, it wasn’t until the 2005 NEC that it required the voltage system to identify ungrounded conductors where a building had more than one voltage system.

The stated purpose of the National Electrical Code (NEC) is the practical safeguarding of people and property from hazards arising from electricity use. One way to help do this is to ensure there is enough room around electrical equipment.


This article reviews changes in Chapter 3, Wiring and Methods and Materials, and Chapter 4, Equipment for General Use, in the 2017 edition of the National Electrical Code (NEC).
 336.10 Uses Permitted


More on Codes & Standards

 
Type SE Cable, AFCI Revisions and More

Article 110 Requirements for Electrical Installations; Article 210 Branch Circuits; Article 225 Outside Branch Circuits and Feeders; Article 250 Grounding and Bonding; Article 338 Service-Entrance Cable: Type SE and Types USE; Article 396 Messenger-Supported Wiring; Article 404 Switches; Article 408


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Branch-Circuit, Feeder and Service Calculations, Part XXVI

Article 220 of the National Electrical Code (NEC) contains requirements for calculating branch-circuit, feeder and service loads.


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Neutral or Not?

Everyone in the electrical industry, including the electrical apprentice, the journeyman, the master electrician, electrical contractor, electrical engineer, designer, the electrical inspector, et al., seem to use the phrase “neutral conductor.” However, until the 2008 National Electrical Code (NEC)


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Sealed and Delivered

While I was teaching a seminar for the National Fire Protection Agency (NFPA), a student asked a series of interesting questions.


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AFCIs, Cable Trays and More

Article 100 Definitions; Article 210 Branch Circuits; Article 250 Grounding and Bonding; Article 300 Wiring Methods; Article 310 Conductors for General Wiring; Article 334 Nonmetallic-Sheathed Cable: Types NM, NMC, and NMS; Article 392 Cable Trays; Article 422 Appliances; Article 440 Air-Conditionin


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A Serious Decision

Occasionally, a change occurs in the National Electrical Code (NEC), and the ramifications are not realized until after the Code is issued. One such change can be found in Section 210.4(B) in the 2008 NEC.


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Read the Directions

JaeI receive many questions on how to design and install the electrical system for a separately derived system, including the use of the grounded neutral conductor. Naturally, grounding and bonding the secondary side always is a major issue as well as how the neutral conductor is used.


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