Codes & Standards

 

Essential to the work of the electrical contractor is knowledge of the National Electrical Code, the National Electrical Installation Standards and additional standards and codes administered by the National Fire Protection Association, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and others. Here is a list of all our articles on codes and standards listed chronologically by issue date. 

Jim Dollard has an extensive background in codes and standards. If you have a query about the National Electrical Code (NEC), Jim will help you solve it. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@gmail.com. Answers are based on the 2014 NEC.
 Grounding electrode
conductor termination


The first National Electrical Code (NEC) was developed in 1897. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) became the developer and publisher of the National Electrical Code (NEC) in 1911, and the NFPA continues to develop and publish the Code today.

New text in section 424.66(A) of the 2014 National Electrical Code (NEC) covers working space for electrical enclosures of resistance heating-element-type duct heaters mounted on air-duct systems in limited-access areas.

For many years, The National Electrical Code (NEC) has provided rules for equipment disconnects. NEC requirements are very specific for motors and motor-driven machinery, but they differ from lockout/tagout rules in NFPA 70E, Standard for Electrical Safety in the Workplace. The reason is simple.

More on Codes & Standards

 
General Installation Requirements, Part III

Article 110 in the National Electrical Code (NEC) covers general requirements for the examination and approval, installation and use, and access to spaces about electrical conductors and equipment; enclosures intended for personnel entry; and tunnel installations (110.1).

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Moving Forward

The DC Task Group of the NEC Correlating Committee is proposing three new articles for the 2017 edition of the National Electrical Code (NEC). The first is Article 706, covering energy-storage systems (ESS). The second is Article 710, covering microgrids.

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When The NEC Causes Confusion

The National Electrical Code (NEC) requires all boxes and enclosures—including transfer switches, generators and power panels that are part of an emergency system—to be marked so they are readily identifiable as a component of the emergency system.

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Point of supply

Protecting Conductors, Safer Switchgear And More

Jim Dollard has an extensive background in codes and standards. If you have a query about the National Electrical Code (NEC), Jim will help you solve it. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@gmail.com. Answers are based on the 2014 NEC.
 Point of supply


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Avoid Costly Mistakes

The model building code treats campus dormitories as residential occupancies. However, a dorm does not function the same as a commercial apartment building. In some cases, the architect has created a physical design to accommodate as many students as possible.

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Multiwire Branch Circuits

Are multiwire branch circuits becoming antiquated for most new installations, or are they still being used in most circuit applications?

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General Installation Requirements, Part II

The National Electrical Code (NEC) is divided into an introduction and nine chapters with 10 informational annexes. As specified in 90.5(D), the informative annexes are not part of the NEC’s enforceable requirements but are included for informational purposes only.

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