Codes & Standards

 

Essential to the work of the electrical contractor is knowledge of the National Electrical Code, the National Electrical Installation Standards and additional standards and codes administered by the National Fire Protection Association, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and others. Here is a list of all our articles on codes and standards listed chronologically by issue date. 

Article 310 in the National Electrical Code (NEC) covers general requirements for conductors and their type designations, insulations, markings, mechanical strengths, ampacity ratings and uses.

A recent change in the 2014 National Electrical Code (NEC) creates a new method for determining the size of service and feeder conductors for 120/240-volt (V), single-phase services for one-family, individual units of two-family dwellings, and individual units for multifamily dwellings.

The 2014 National Electrical Code (NEC) has new requirements for field-applied hazard warning markings, signs and labels. Throughout the NEC, rules that required signs, labels and other markings also required a specific signal word be included in the sign, label or marking.

Jim Dollard has an extensive background in codes and standards. If you have a query about the National Electrical Code (NEC), Jim will help you solve it. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@gmail.com. Answers are based on the 2014 NEC.
 Previous use of gray conductors


More on Codes & Standards

 
Parallel Conductors, Threaded Pitches and More

If you have a problem related to the National ElectricalCode (NEC), are experiencing difficulty in understanding a Code requirement, or are wondering why or if such a requirement exists, ask Charlie, and he will let the Code decide. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@earthlink.net.

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Editors' Pick
NEC 2014 Outlook

The 2014 National Electrical Code (NEC) development process is in full swing with the NEC technical committees acting on 3,745 proposed new articles and revisions. New and improving technologies and industry advances are driving changes into the electrical industry at an accelerated pace.

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Which Is It?
by Staff |

Motor-control circuits may be very low voltage; they may be in the 12- to 24-volt (V) alternating current (AC) or direct current (DC) range or as high as 600V.

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Arbiter of an Argument

A contractor asked me to inspect the grounding and bonding of a service that he installed for a customer. He was told that the service had been grounded wrong and that it was dangerous to be powered up by the utility. Therefore, the owner would not pay the contractor for services rendered.

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Sizing Grounding Electrode Conductors, Restroom Receptacles and More

If you have a problem related to the National Electrical Code (NEC), are experiencing difficulty in understanding a Code requirement, or are wondering why or if such a requirement exists, ask Charlie, and he will let the Code decide. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@earthlink.net.

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Sizing Conductors, Part XVI

When sizing conductors, the rating of the overcurrent device must also be considered.

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New Building Standards to Save Money and Power

Always a leader in renewable power and new technology, the Golden State has taken another step to make sure it stays out in front.

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