Codes & Standards

 

Essential to the work of the electrical contractor is knowledge of the National Electrical Code, the National Electrical Installation Standards and additional standards and codes administered by the National Fire Protection Association, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and others. Here is a list of all our articles on codes and standards listed chronologically by issue date. 

Point of supply


Jim Dollard has an extensive background in codes and standards. If you have a query about the National Electrical Code (NEC), Jim will help you solve it. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@gmail.com. Answers are based on the 2014 NEC.
 Point of supply


The model building code treats campus dormitories as residential occupancies. However, a dorm does not function the same as a commercial apartment building. In some cases, the architect has created a physical design to accommodate as many students as possible.

Are multiwire branch circuits becoming antiquated for most new installations, or are they still being used in most circuit applications?

The National Electrical Code (NEC) is divided into an introduction and nine chapters with 10 informational annexes. As specified in 90.5(D), the informative annexes are not part of the NEC’s enforceable requirements but are included for informational purposes only.

Electrical Contractor

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Reexamining Healthcare Reform

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) was signed into law more than three years ago. It is still not ready to roll out.


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Grounding Well Casings, Dry-Type Transformers and More

If you have a problem related to the National Electrical Code (NEC), are experiencing difficulty in understanding a Code requirement, or are wondering why or if such a requirement exists, ask Charlie, and he will let the Code decide. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@earthlink.net.

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Sizing Conductors, Part XXVII

Section 240.21 in the National Electrical Code (NEC) contains feeder tap rules. As defined in 240.2, a tap conductor has overcurrent protection ahead of its point of supply that exceeds the value permitted for similar conductors that are protected as described elsewhere in 240.4.

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Sizing Conductors, Part XXVI

Table 310.15(B)(16) is one of the most referenced tables in the National Electrical Code (NEC). It contains allowable (or maximum) ampacities for insulated conductors rated up to and including 2,000 volts (V). The ampacities listed in this table are based on specific conditions.


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Get Over Your Astraphobia

I was involved recently in a discussion on lightning protection for various types of buildings and what standards applied to those installations or if the installations required compliance with NFPA 780, Standard for the Installation of Lightning Protection Systems; UL 96A, Standard for Installation

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Editors' Pick
FAQs On SPDs

A recent training program discussed the requirements for connecting surge protection at service equipment.

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Bathroom Panel, Free Conductor and More

If you have a problem related to the National Electrical Code (NEC), are experiencing difficulty in understanding a Code requirement, or are wondering why or if such a requirement exists, send in your questions and we will let the Code decide. Questions can be sent to codefaqs@earthlink.net.

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