The Evolving Role of Electrical Contractors

Market Research

At ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR magazine, we constantly analyze our market and our readers. In fact, our annual market research budget, including internal/external reader preference studies, is well into six figures. That investment is vital to understanding and providing our readers with the most complete, comprehensive and accurate editorial product available. It also is a valuable marketing tool for our advertisers.
 

Profile of the Electrical Contractor

Along with the full Profile report, ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR publishes a companion feature article.

The full 2016 Profile of the Electrical Contractor report features 90 pages of in-depth research data that is free to all for industry use.

Along with the full Profile report, ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR publishes a companion feature article.

The full 2014 Profile of the Electrical Contractor report features 90 pages of in-depth research data that is free to all for industry use.

One of the electrical contractor's most valuable assets is its vehicle fleet. The vast majority continue to require transportation.

The full Profile of the Electrical Contractor report features 69 pages of in-depth research data that is free to all for industry use.

Despite a decline in contractors reportedly purchasing tools, the majority continue to purchase rather than lease.

On average, the majority of electrical contractors are participating in design/build projects, bringing in big business

Along with the full Profile report, ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR publishes a companion feature article.

Related Feature Articles

  • The majority of electrical contracting firms (72 percent) have a staff ranging from one to nine, and 68 percent of electrical contracting firms have annual revenues of less than $1 million.
  • The 2016 Profile found that 20 percent of electrical contracting firms added employees in the previous 12 to 18 months. Meanwhile, 13 percent of firms reported losing employees, but that measure is down from 18 percent in the 2014 study.
  • The percentage of Profile respondents who have some higher education is increasing. In our 2016 study, 22 percent of respondents reported having a bachelor's degree, up from 19 percent in the 2014 study.
  • ECs make the most revenue (39 percent) in maintenance, service and repair work. New construction is second at 32 percent, and modernization and retrofits are third at 27 percent
  • Electrical power and distribution account for 43 percent of the average EC's revenue, down from 69 percent in our 2004 study. Over the last dozen years, ECs have really diversified.
  • The 2016 Profile of the Electrical Contractor finds 95 percent of ECs are involved in low-voltage work. Ten percent of ECs now have separate divisions to handle this work. In companies with 10 or more employees, one in four have separate low-voltage divisions. ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR magazine continues to publish the bimonthly supplement, INTEGRATED SYSTEMS CONTRACTOR, to inform this market.

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Baxter Readership Studies

Baxter Research Center ad studies are conducted via e-mail survey four issues a year using advertising and editorial reader research methods. This sample is selected from our qualified circulation of 85,370 (BPA, June 2010). This research measures the effectiveness of an ad or editorial's ability to attract the reader's attention in that issue.

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