William Atkinson

Freelance Writer

William Atkinson has been a full-time business magazine writer since 1976. Contact him at w.atkinson@mchsi.com.

Articles by William Atkinson

May 2015
The National Electrical Safety Code (NESC) Main Committee is well into the revision process for the 2017 edition, due to be published Aug. 1, 2016.
 However, there is a difference this time. Beyond looking short-term at some changes for the next revision, the committee is looking further into the future—in fact, 100 years down the road.
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May 2015
According to the Eaton Blackout Tracker 2013, the No. 1 cause of power outages in 2013 was weather/trees (966 outages). Faulty equipment and human error were a close second (921 outages). Vehicle accidents were a distant third (354), followed by animals (206), planned outages (175), theft/­vandalism (30), and over-demand (6). A total of 578 outages were classified as “unknown.”
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May 2015
Power management company 
Eaton is taking a fully interactive, 40-foot trailer on a nationwide tour of major industrial centers to meet the increasing demand for electrical safety training. The 2015 mobile training tour began Feb. 23 in Houston and is moving across the country throughout the year.
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April 2015
In December 2014, it was announced that GE Global Research, GE Energy Consulting, National Grid (a utility in the Northeast), the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Clarkson University (Potsdam, N.Y.) were forming a partnership in a research project to develop an enhanced microgrid control system (eMCS) designed to improve the reliability and resiliency of elec READ MORE
April 2015
Intrepid Electronic Systems operates from two locations in California—Oakland and San Jose—with 25–35 employees at each location. Founded in 1997, the company focuses only on low-voltage systems. 
 “I have been doing this kind of work myself since 1976,” said Kurt Brinkman, owner.
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April 2015
In October 2011, the Illinois General Assembly enacted the Energy Infrastructure Modernization Act (EIMA). One of the main beneficiaries was ComEd, the Chicago-based electric/gas utility. With the passage of the EIMA, ComEd embarked on a 10-year, $2.6 billion program to modernize its power system.
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March 2015
More residential, commercial, industrial and even governmental utility customers are becoming involved in self-generation projects (solar, wind, storage batteries, fuel cells, multisource microgrids, etc.) to reduce the costs associated with electric grid-generated power, as well as to ensure continuous power during grid outages. READ MORE
March 2015
When residential rooftop solar and other distributed generation (DG) technologies began making headway, it was seen as a win-win situation. Residents would win by generating their own power more reliably and less expensively than their local utilities. Utilities would win because they would be under less pressure to build large new generation units.
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March 2015
In the early days of the United States, people generated their own power. Then, over time, starting with the first electric utility, Thomas Edison's Pearl Street Station in New York in the late 1800s, centralized utilities came into existence and began providing power to the majority of people, eliminating their need to generate their own power. READ MORE

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